Paul S. Reinsch Papers, 1835-1924, 1963

Container Title
Wis Mss VP
Part 1 (Wis Mss VP): Original Collection, 1905-1961
Physical Description: 120.5 c.f. (276 archives boxes, 15 flat boxes, and 6 card file boxes) 
Scope and Content Note

The Original Collection is arranged into series as follows: Correspondence, Diaries and Biographical Notes, Research Files, Miscellaneous Files, and Card Files.

With the exception of the diaries, written between 1905 and 1911, and one letter, July 30, 1914, the papers in the Original Collection cover the years from 1921 until Witte's death in 1960. They are almost entirely concerned with his professional work and are most voluminous following 1933, after he became a full-time teacher and began to undertake federal appointments.

In size, the correspondence constitutes 30 per cent of the collection, and Witte's research files make up another 56 per cent. Miscellaneous files such as articles, addresses, class lectures, and studies account for 7 per cent; and the remainder is composed of his bibliographical card indexes. The small volumes contained in Box 88 add virtually nothing to the size of the collection; but these diaries of his student years have worth and interest that far outweigh their bulk.

Correspondence

Dr. Witte's correspondents in the years between 1921 and 1960 included former students, teaching associates at Wisconsin and elsewhere, economists and social scientists working for both industry and government, members of Congress, industrialists, arbitrators, and officers of organizations interested in labor legislation and social security. There are occasional letters from strangers referring to an article or speech by Witte, or asking him for advice, but in general, his correspondence was with individuals whom he knew or worked with professionally. There are practically no family letters, although correspondents who were acquainted with his family often made references to different members.

As a university teacher, Witte had much correspondence with students working on theses or seeking recommendations. In what were frequently long letters containing suggestions or criticisms for chapters, he often revealed his own thinking concerning social and economic problems. The same is true of his correspondence with other teachers, industrial relations experts, and government personnel, many of whom were once students of Witte's. He sometimes wrote at some length to clarify his position or to argue a point. The extent to which he explained his views is illustrated by a letter of July 14, 1945 to a former student, Joseph A. Todd, in which he discussed the international economic situation.

Throughout the correspondence there is information relating to the University of Wisconsin, particularly the Department of Economics, and to committees and studies. Since Professor Witte was often absent from the campus, departmental secretaries as well as other faculty members wrote him of university affairs. During the retirement of John R. Commons, particularly from 1938 to 1944 while he was living in Florida, Witte wrote him long and informative letters relating to the University and the field of economics.

There is correspondence relating to problems of the State of Wisconsin, particularly in the 1920s, when Witte was Legislative Reference Librarian, and in the 1930s when he served on the Planning Board and the Labor Relations Board. In 1935, he assisted Governor Philip F. La Follette in preparing legislation relating to the Social Security Act. In fact, Witte was the author of a letter from La Follette to Franklin D. Roosevelt, October 29, 1935, setting forth ideas on appropriations for various federal aids under the act.

It was Witte's custom to file separately the correspondence relating to the numerous organizations, boards, and committees of which he was a member. These included private organizations and boards and committees connected with the university, the state, and the federal government. Although letters in these files are usually concerned with the organization or committee involved, many of them touch on social and economic problems beyond the work of the group itself. Since other members of the group were frequently economists also, it was natural that they and Witte should discuss issues when writing each other about organization or committee work. The files of the American Association for Labor Legislation and the Industrial Relations Research Association offer examples of this type of correspondence, where letters exchanged with John B. Andrews, Sumner Slichter, and Merlyn S. Pitzele contain more than just reference to association business.

In view of his reputation in the field of labor legislation, there is a surprisingly small amount of correspondence with labor leaders themselves. It is true Witte corresponded with men such as Matthew Woll and William Green between 1925 and 1934 in regard to anti-injunction bills and unemployment insurance, and with Walter P. Reuther between 1957 and 1959 regarding the work of the UAW International Union and the UAW Public Review Board; but there is little evidence in the papers that leaders of organized labor kept in close contact with Witte, tried to influence his thinking, or were consulted by him. A letter of December 4, 1940 may help to explain this. To R.W. Leach Witte wrote, “It is part of my creed that in all matters affecting labor, the employer's point of view should be given just as much consideration as labor's point of view.”

This is not to imply that letters dealing with labor problems and legislation are lacking. The labor relations theme is evident throughout the correspondence, as the following examples show: Witte corresponded with John B. Andrews, secretary of the American Association for Labor Legislation, frequently between 1929 and 1937; with Felix Frankfurter and Francis B. Sayer in 1928 in regard to the anti-injunction bill; with Sumner H. Slichter from 1932 to 1956 concerning labor problems; with Dr. Leifur Magnusson of the International Labor Organization in 1938 relative to the attitude of business groups toward labor legislation; with Selig Perlman between 1938 and 1939 regarding the American labor movement; with Senator Paul Douglas from 1946 to 1949 in reference to the closed shop and the Taft-Hartley Act; and with Nathan Feinsinger in 1958 on right-to-work legislation.

In his role as mediator in disputes between labor and industry he corresponded to some extent with representatives of both labor and management; but only concerning cases on which he sat as arbitrator, and even then in a routine way. His written decisions, on the other hand, reveal his thinking in connection with labor disputes, as he sometimes went to some lengths to explain himself. He kept in touch with other arbitrators and sometimes referred to cases and decisions. For instance, he and the lawyer David A. Wolff corresponded in 1945 and 1946. Wolff had worked with Witte in Detroit, and was mediator in the Chrysler strike of 1945.

Just as the theme of labor legislation runs through the correspondence, so also does the subject of social security. After he directed the writing of the original Social Security Act of 1935, Witte continued, in varying degrees, to keep in touch with its development and expansion. He remained in contact officially by virtue of his membership on the Advisory Council and his position as a consultant to the Social Security Board, and unofficially by reason of his long association with key personnel. Arthur J. Altmeyer, as commissioner of Social Security; I.S. Falk, Ewan Clague, and Wilbur Cohen of the Bureau of Research and Statistics; and Robert J. Myers of the actuarial division either asked for his opinion or sent him information concerning developments. Copies of inter-office communications were sometimes sent to Witte also, especially in connection with the work of the Advisory Council.

Social security amendments, financing, and studies were also the subjects of correspondence between Witte and individuals outside the government office. Problems were discussed with other professors such as William Haber of Michigan State, Elizabeth Brandeis Raushenbush of Wisconsin, and Theresa S. McMahon of Washington; with the lawyer Herman Ekern; with the labor legislation expert John B. Andrews; and with senators such as Robert M. La Follette aid Alexander Wiley. A letter, April 15, 1937, to Sir William Beveridge, director of the London School of Economics, discusses Beveridge's factual analysis of unemployment problems as related to the United States. These are simply examples of the many letters relating to the whole field of social security. Topics in the correspondence include almost every phase of the movement: old age and survivor's insurance, unemployment insurance, workmen's compensation, actuarial problems, pension plans, health services and insurance, and public assistance.

In general it had been Dr. Witte's custom to keep his correspondence filed alphabetically, by person, although in many instances, notably social security, he kept a separate correspondence file under that title. In addition, he had files of correspondence relating to organizations, committees, and conferences under their respective titles; files of arbitration cases under company or case; and miscellaneous matters under subject or individual. An attempt has been made to draw all of these into an easily usable whole, without completely destroying Witte's original intent.

The correspondence in the Original Collection is now organized in seven sub-categories. (1) General Correspondence, 1914, 1921-1961, is chronological by month. (2) Social Security Correspondence, 1934-1954, also is chronological by month. (3) The category on Arbitration Cases is alphabetical by case; correspondence precedes other material on each case and is arranged chronologically by month. (4) Organizations and Committees (except University of Wisconsin and state and federal government bodies) is alphabetical, then chronological by month as are the files for (5) University of Wisconsin, (6) Wisconsin - State Government, and (7) United States - Federal Government.

A difficulty for users lies in the fact that the correspondence of some individuals, or that concerning some subjects, may be found in more than one place. The correspondence of Wilbur J. Cohen and the subject of social security is one such example. Cohen was a student of Witte's at Wisconsin and was his research assistant while the Social Security Act was being written. During the years that Cohen remained in the social security offices in Washington, and later when he was professor at Michigan State, he and Witte exchanged long and comparatively frequent letters. Many of these Witte filed with the social security correspondence, and yet some may also be found in the general correspondence. In addition, Cohen and Witte were both interested in some of the same organizations, and under the names of these there will also be Cohen correspondence. Examples are the American Gerontological Congress of 1951, the John B. Andrews Symposium, and the Federal Advisory Council.

The researcher is thus cautioned that correspondence relating to a particular person or to a particular subject may require search in more than one place.

There follows a list of many of the individuals with whom Witte corresponded. Because it was impossible to index the papers, this is not a complete list, nor do the inclusive years always represent all letters. It is believed, however, that this includes Witte's more significant correspondence, and that the years given will serve as a reliable guide to the researcher. (Letters of tribute, February and March 1957, on the occasion of Witte's retirement, are described with Part 5 of this collection, the Microfilmed Papers. Copies of replies to them appear in the Original Collection in the general correspondence.)

Correspondence marked “G” appears in the general correspondence; those marked “SS” are in the social security correspondence.

Correspondents

Abbott, Grace1937 JanuaryG
Altmeyer, Arthur J.1935-1954G, SS
Andrews, John B.1924-1937G, SS
Baruch, Bernard M.1958 JanuaryG
Beveridge, Sir William1937, AprilSS
Blaine, John J.1928-1932G
Brown, J. Douglas1935-1940G, SS
Clague, Ewan1937-1953G, SS
Cohen, Wilbur J.1935-1960G, SS
Commons, John R.1921-1944G
Doughton, Robert L.1935SS
Douglas, Paul1946-1949G
Dykstra, C.A.1937-1943G
Ekern, Herman1934-1939G, SS
Ely, Richard T.1941-1942G
Epstein, Abraham1933-1937, 1950-1953G
Evjue, William T.1936-1939G
Falk, I.S.1937-1939, 1952SS
Feinsinger, Nathan1948-1958G
Folsom, Marion B.1936SS
Frankfurter, Felix1925-1934, 1951G
Fred, E.B.1941-1952G
Goldberg, Arthur1954G
Goldy, Daniel J.1939-1943, 1957G
Green, William1928-1934G
Haber, William1936-1956G, SS
Handley, J.J.1933-1939G
Hochstein, Irma1940-1960G
Houghton, Ronald W.1939-1959G
Kaltenborn, Howard S.1941-1959G
Kennedy, John F.1952, 1957G
Keyserling, Leon H.1958, 1960G
Killingsworth, Charles1942-1960G
Knowles, William H.1948-1957G
Kubista, Roy1934-1935G
La Follette, Philip F.1932-1937G
La Follette, Robert M., Jr.1934-1939G, SS
Lampman, Robert J.1948-1956G
Lawrence, David1947G
Leiserson, William M.1934-1947G
Lilienthal, David E.1923, 1941-1951G
Mackraz, James A.1951-1960G
Magnusson, Leifur1938G
Marquand, Hilary A.1939-1959G
McMahon, Theresa S.1936-1959G, SS
Morse, Wayne1943-1953, 1959G
Myers, Robert J.1939, 1958-1960G
Norris, George W.1928-1929G
Perkins, Frances1936-1948,1958-1960G
Perlman, Mark1946-1955G
Perlman, Selig1938-1953G
Pitzele, Merlyn S.1940-1956G
Raushenbush, Elizabeth (Brandeis)1937-1946G, SS
Raushenbush, Paul1935-1939G
Reuther, Walter P.1957-1959G
Richberg, Donald1928-1930G
Robinson, George Buchan1940-1951SS
Roosevelt, Franklin D.1935, 1942, 1944-1945G
Rosenberry, Marvin B.1950 JanuaryG
Saks, John1945-1952G
Saposs, David J.1941, 1958G
Sayre, Francis B.1928G
Slichter, Sumner H.1932-1957G
Taylor, George W.1951-1952G
Taylor, Henry C.1941-1944G
Todd, Joseph A.1941-1953G
Truman, Harry S.1945-1949, 1957G
Tugwell, Rexford G.1953, JanuaryG
Wiley, Alexander1942-1948G, SS
Winant, John G.1935-1936SS
Wolff, David A.1945-1946, 1959G
Woll, Mathew1925-1930G
Young, Edwin1953G

Diaries and Biographical Notes

When Edwin E. Witte first entered the University of Wisconsin in 1905 he started keeping a diary, and continued the practice intermittently until June of 1911, while he was a graduate student. He used pocket notebooks, and wrote at length on his impressions and aspirations, as well as on his activities, often including several days in one writing. He made frequent references to teachers, students, lectures, and campus activities such as the debating society and student government. He sometimes wrote on his political viewpoint and his inclination toward specialization in labor legislation. There is evidence in the diaries of 1910 that John R. Commons influenced him in his decision to change from the field of history to economics.

There are six personal diaries, and a seventh notebook in which Witte kept a record of meetings of the Athenaean Literary Society. This was a debating society in which he was very active, and between 1906 and 1908 he kept notes on the debates given and his appraisal of them.

An eighth volume is a record of speeches rather than a diary. In a book that contains his class rolls for 1921 to 1937, Witte recorded addresses he gave while director of the Committee on Economic Security 1934-1935, in support of the Social Security Act. There are also lists of other speeches given between 1935 and 1937, including further talks on social security.

Research Files

Dr. Witte kept extensive files for his own use in doing research. The material in them covers practically every phase of his interest in industrial relations, social security, economics, and the relation of government to business. These files include clippings from newspapers, magazines, and the Congressional Record; mimeographed information; reprints of abstracts, articles, and studies; notes Witte made from speeches he heard or articles he read; student papers; and government documents, chiefly proposed Congressional bills and labor and social security leaflets.

The Research Files are sub-divided into four categories: Economics, Government, Industrial Relations, and Social Security. Within each category there are sub-categories in alphabetical order. The files comprise Boxes 89-254.

As these files originally came to the Archives they contained random copies of letters, articles, and addresses by Mr. Witte. Wherever these were found they were removed and placed in the general correspondence or were filed with articles and addresses. After conversations with associates and government personnel, Witte sometimes jotted down his impressions of what had been said. Wherever these notes were found in the research files they, too, were removed and filed with general correspondence.

Miscellaneous Files

Materials included in the miscellaneous files are articles and addresses by Witte, examples of his class lectures and notes, studies made or compiled by Witte, student reports and term papers relating to the field in which he was particularly interested, and a manuscript copy of “The Courts and Labor Disputes,“ his doctoral dissertation.

Before the Witte papers were given to the Archives, Mrs. Witte made bibliographies of government and non-government publications in the Witte library, and of articles and addresses by Dr. Witte. The latter included particularly articles and addresses relating to social security, injunctions, and trade union law. Copies of these bibliographies are in the miscellaneous files.

Card Files

The card files kept by Dr. Witte represent bibliographies, with some notes, relating to each of the fields in which he was most interested: government and business, economics, industrial relations, and social security.

Series: Correspondence
Subseries: General correspondence
Arrangement of the Materials: Chronological by month.
Box   1
1914 July 30; 1921-1934 May
Box   2
1934 June-1936 June
Box   3
1936 July-1937 October
Box   4
1937 November-1938
Box   5
1939-1940 April
Box   6
1940 May-1941 September
Box   7
1941 October-1942 September
Box   8
1942 October-1944 February
Box   9
1944 March-1945 September
Box   10
1945 October-1946 August
Box   11
1946 September-1947 April
Box   12
1947 May-November
Box   13
1947 December-1948 June
Box   14
1948 July-1949 February
Box   15
1949 March-October
Box   16
1949 November-1950 April
Box   17
1950 May-November
Box   18
1950 December-1951 June
Box   19
1951 July-1952 January
Box   20
1952 February-September
Box   21
1952 October-1953 February
Box   22
1953 March-September
Box   23
1953 October-1954 May
Box   24
1954 June-December
Box   25
1955 January-May
Box   26
1955 June-December
Box   27
1956 January-May
Box   28
1956 June-1957 February
Box   29
1957 April-December
Box   30
1958 January-October
Box   31
1958 November-1959 December
Box   32
1960 January-July; 1961 September
Box   33-35
Subseries: Social Security Correspondence, 1934 March-1951 January
Arrangement of the Materials: Chronological by month.
Subseries: Arbitration cases
Arrangement of the Materials: Cases arranged in alphabetical order. Correspondence, in chronological order by months, precedes other material on each case.
Box   36
A-Glo
Box   37
Glo-Hou
Box   38
How-Mea
Box   39
Mea-Mis
Box   40
Mon-Oli
Box   41
Pae-Sun
Box   42
Uni-Wan
Subseries: Organizations and Committees
Note: See separate headings below for University of Wisconsin, State of Wisconsin, and United States government.

Arrangement of the Materials: Alphabetical by organization, committee, or conference. Within each, material is chronological by month. Exception: NWLB cases are left in original order.
Box   43
Administrative Management, President's Committee on, 1921-1938 (unofficial)
Box   43
American Arbitration Association, 1941-1943
Box   43
American Association for Labor Legislation, 1936-1945
Box   43
American Association for Social Security, 1938, 1940-1944
Box   43
American Council on Public Affairs, 1940-1944
American Economic Association
Box   43
1938, 1940-1945, 1947, 1951, 1954-1955 November
Box   44
1955 December-1956 April
Box   45
1956 May-June
Box   46
1956 August-December
Box   47
1957-1959
Box   47
American Motors Corporation, Guaranteed Annual Wage Conference, 1955
Box   47
American Motors Corporation, Committee of Economists, 1957
Box   48
American Political Science Association, 1938-1947, 1949-1950
Box   48
American Society for Public Administration, 1941-1943
Box   48
Andrews, John B., Symposium, 1946-1951
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   48
Chicago, University of, Industrial Relations Center, 1947-1953
Box   48
Commission on Hospital Financing, 1952-1951, 1956
Box   49
Committee for Non-profit Health Insurance Plan (Milwaukee), 1953-1954
Box   49
Consumer's League, National, 1947-1953
Box   49
Council of State Governments, 1933-1951
Box   49
Gerontological Conference, Second, 1950 November-1952 January
Box   49
“Human Relations in Management,” General Robert Johnson, 1948-1953
Box   49
Illinois, University of, Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations, 1946-1953
Industrial Relations Research Association
Box   50
1946-1953
Box   51
1954-1956, 1958
Box   51
Jersey Roundtable, 1953
Box   51
Michigan State Social Security Conference, 1958
Box   51
Mid-West Economic Association, 1951-1953
Box   51
National Academy of Arbitrators, 1947-1960
Box   52
National Electrical Benefit Fund, Board, 1946-1959
Box   53
National Foremen's Institute, 1949-1953
Box   53
National Institute of Labor Education, 1958
Box   53
National Municipal League, Committee on the Primary System, 1949 August-1950 February
Box   53
National Planning Association, on improved industrial relations, 1948-1953
Box   53
National Social Welfare Assembly, National Committee on the Aging, 1952-1953
Box   53
Princeton University, Industrial Relations Section, 1946-1952
Box   53
Retirement Advisors Inc., 1958-1960
Box   53
Retirement Counsellors Inc., 1957-1960
Social Science Research Council
Box   53
Committee on Public Administration, 1935-1944
Box   54
Committee on Social Security, 1939-1942
Box   54
Conference on Industrial Relations, 1939
Box   54
Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, “Industrial Conflict,” 1951 April-1952 July
Box   54
Twentieth Century Fund, 1949-1953
Box   54
UAW Public Advisory Committee on Social Security, 1939-1956
Box   55-56
UAW Public Review Board, 1957 May-1960 May
University of Wisconsin
Arrangement of the Materials: Alphabetical by organization, committee, or conference. Within each, material is chronological by month.
Box   57
Athletic Board, 1936-1940
Box   57
Centennial Committee, Educational Conference, 1948
Box   57
Civil Service Employees Joint Council, 1939-1941
Box   57
Committees, miscellaneous
Box   57
Coordination (Integration) Proposals for Higher Education, Legislative sessions of 1955
Box   57
Economics Department, miscellaneous studies and reports, 1933-1953
Box   58
Faculty Seminar on the Wisconsin Old Age Problem, 1950-1951
Box   58
Graduate School, 1934-1950
Industrial Relations Center
Box   58
1945-1948 November
Box   59
1948 December-1956
Box   60
Labor-Management Board, 1939-1956
Box   60
Lecture Committee, 1946-1950
Box   60
Phi Beta Kappa, 1955-1957
Box   60
Political Science Department, 1936-1946
Box   60
Public Relations, 1934-1949
Box   60
Public Service, Sub-Committee on Functions and Policies, 1948
Box   60
Requirements in American History and Government, 1951-1952
Box   60
Retirement Study, 1950-1953
Box   61
School for Workers, 1933-1957
Box   62
Sidney Hillman Memorial Lectures, 1955-1956
Box   62
Social Security and the University Faculty, 1953-1957
Box   62
Special Committee on Speakers before Students, 1952-1953
Box   62
University Bills in the Legislature, 1935-1939
Box   62
University Club Lecture Committee, 1940-1942
Wisconsin - State government
Arrangement of the Materials: Alphabetical by organization, committee, or conference. Within each, material is chronological by month.
Box   63
Citizen's Committee on Public Welfare, 1936, 1949
Box   63
Interim Committee on Taxation, 1934
Box   63
Labor Relations Board, 1937-1939
Box   64
Legislative Reference Library, 1949-1953
Box   64
NRA Codes, 1933-1936
Box   64
Old Age Study, 1951-1952
Box   64
Public Welfare in Wisconsin - Sub-committee on Administration, 1936
Box   64
State Historical Society, 1948-1953
Box   64
State Planning Board, 1935-1940
Box   64
State Taxation Committee, 1933-1935
Box   64
Trade Practices Commission, Wage Survey, 1936-1937
United States - Federal government
Arrangement of the Materials: Alphabetical by organization, committee, or conference. Within each material is chronological by month. Exception: NWLB cases are left in original order.
Box   65
Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government, 1948
Committee on Economic Security, Reports, Studies, and Data, 1934-1935
Box   65
Child welfare
Box   65
Committee activities
Box   65
Committee publications
Box   66
Congressional bills and reports
Box   66
Congressional debate and comments
Box   66
Economic security program (appendices)
Box   67
Employment opportunities
Box   67
Health in relation to economic security, Volume I, II
Box   67
Health in relation to social security-risks due to illness
Box   68
Hearings on S. 1130, H.R. 4120
Box   68
Medical Advisory Board - Proceedings
Box   68
Old age security
Box   69
Public employment and relief
Box   69
Senate notebook
Box   69
Social Insurance, Volume I
Box   70
Social Insurance, Volume II
Box   70
Staff report (Preliminary, 1934 September)
Box   70
Townsend proposals (factual data)
Box   71
Unemployment compensation, Volume I, II, III
Box   72
Conference on Children in a Democracy, 1939
Box   72
Economic Stabilization Agency, Wage Stabilization Board, 1951-1952
Federal Advisory Council
Box   72
1941-1942
Box   73
1943-1953
Box   74
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, 1946-1953
Box   74
Health Needs of the Nation, President's Commission on, 1952
Box   74
National Defense Mediation Board, 1941-1942
National War Labor Board (NWLB)
Box   74
History, 1940-1946
Box   74
Research and statistics reports, 1-31
Box   75
Wage statistics, 1941-1946
Box   75
Effects of wage policies
Wage policies
Box   75
1940-1943 August
Box   76
1943 September-1953
Box   76
Wage stabilization, 1943-1944
Box   77
Enforcement, 1944-1945, 1947
Box   77
Policy statements, 1942-1945
Box   77
Board minutes and resolutions, 1944 July-1945 December
Box   78
Significant Board actions, summaries, 1-8
Box   78
Appraisal of work of the Board, 1942-1947, 1954, 1957
NWLB cases
Box   79
A-B
Box   80
C
Box   81
D-G
Box   82
H-Mea
Box   83
Mea (continued)-Mon
Box   84
Mor-Reg
Box   85
Rub-T
Box   86
U-Wis
Box   87
Wit-Z
Box   87
Releases and arbitration opinions by Witte
Box   88
Regional releases, 1943-1944
Series: Diaries and Biographical Notes
Diaries
Box   88
Volume 1
1905 September 26-November 14
Box   88
Volume 2
1906 September 26-November 12
Box   88
Volume 3
1909 September 28-December 21
Box   88
Volume 4
1909 December 3-1910 August 6
Box   88
Volume 5
1910 August 15-October 24
Box   88
Volume 6
1910 October 27-1911 June 22
Box   88
Volume 7
Notes on “Aethenae” (Athenaean) meetings, 1906-1908
Box   88
Volume 8
Classbook, 1921-1937
Note: Contains a record of addresses given by Witte while executive director of the Committee on Economic Security, 1934-1935, and other addresses, 1934-1937.
Box   88
Biographical notes and information
Series: Research Files
Subseries: Economics
Economic problems
Box   89
American economy of the 1940s-1950s, description
Box   89
Business point of view on aspects of the economy
Box   89
Campaign to sell free enterprise
Box   90
Capitalism and free enterprise, pro and con
Box   90
Economic conditions affecting government and business
Box   90
History of economic trends
Box   90-91
Planning
Box   91
Prices, production, profits, saving
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   91
Radical programs for economic changes
Box   92
Relation of government to business, American viewpoint
Box   92
Significance of economic trends
Economics
Box   92
Commons (John R.) and “Institutional Economics”
Box   92
Economic concepts
Box   93
Economic theory, general
Physical Description: 4 folders 
Box   93
Economic theories of the future
Box   94
Industrial evolution
Box   94
Inflation and its causes
Box   94
Population problems
Postwar Problems
Box   94
Demobilization
Box   94
Depression
Economic
Box   94
Business prospects and actualities
Box   94
Finances and taxes
Box   95
Foreign countries
Box   95
Inflation and price control
Box   95
Problems of world peace
Box   95
National and international
Box   95-96
Great Britain, policies and proposals
Box   96
Programs for the future
Box   96
Readjustment after World War I and II
Box   96
Reconversion policies, actual and data
Recovery and the New Deal
Box   97
Constitutional aspects
Box   97
Depression remedies, miscellaneous proposals
Box   97
Economic statistics
Box   97
Interpretation of developments in New Deal period
Box   97
Interstate trade barriers
Box   98
Labor and the NRA
Box   98
Legislation and development
Box   98
NRA
Box   98
NRA codes
Box   98
Philosophy of the New Deal
Box   99
Programs of various groups
Box   99
Recovery measures in foreign countries
Box   99
Results of the New Deal
Box   99
State recovery codes
War Economy
Box   99
Allied countries, general
Box   100
Allied countries, labor supply
Box   100
Enemy countries, labor controls and policies
Box   100
Foreign countries, 1939
Box   100
General
Manpower
Box   100-101
General
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   101
Farm labor
Box   101
Industrial training
Box   101
Proposals for legislation
Box   102
War Manpower Commission
Box   102
Women's work
Box   102
Price controls
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   102
Production problems, World War II
Subseries: Government
Box   103
Council of Economic Advisors: Reports to the president
Box   103
Government and Business: Human relations in modern business
Government and Business in Wartime
Box   103
Economy in the United States in 1939
Box   103
General
Box   104
National government in wartime
Box   104
State and local governments in wartime
Box   104
Statistics, World War II
Box   104
Socio-economic effects
Government and Full Employment
Box   104
Bills and proposals
Box   104
In the United States and abroad, general
Box   105
Problems
Government in the Economy
Box   105-106
Agriculture and government
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   106
Government credit agencies
Box   106
Monetary policies, inflation, et cetera
Box   106
Taxes and expenditures, including Wisconsin
Box   106
Trends in relation of government to business
Legislative
Box   107
Bill drafting and budgeting
Box   107
Content, volume, sources of legislation
Box   107
General
Box   107
Improving state legislation
Box   107
Legislative control over administration
Box   108
Legislative procedure
Box   108
Legislative Reference Library of Wisconsin
Box   108
Legislators
Box   108
Lobbying and pressure groups
Box   108
Principles of legislation, judicial review and direct
Box   109
Reapportionment
Box   109
Reference services
Box   109
Unicameral legislature
Powers and Functions
Box   109
Basic economic institutions
Box   110
Business, regulation of
Box   110
Conservation and recreation
Box   110
Education
Box   110
General
Box   110
Government aids to business
Box   111
Government and business in the postwar economy
Box   111
Government in business
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   111
International governmental controls
Box   111
Minerals, atomic energy
Box   112
Price regulation
Box   112
Public utilities
Box   112
Railroad problems
Box   112
Research and information services
Box   113
Role of government in depression and prosperity
Box   113-114
Role of government in the economy
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   114
Theories on relation of government to business
Box   114
Trade and tariff policies
Box   114-115
Trusts and anti-trust legislation
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   115
Trusts and combinations, government policy
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Problems of Government
Box   116
Communism, especially Russian
Box   116
Consumer protection
Box   116
Fascism, especially Italian
Box   116
Farmers and farm organizations, and the role of government
Box   116
Federal government reorganization
Box   116
General
Box   116
Labor and the role of government
Box   117
Personnel, and opportunities for employment
Box   117
Religious groups and the role of government
Box   117
Training for public service
State Government
Box   117
Federal-state aids
Box   117
Improvement and problems
Box   118
Interstate cooperation
Box   118
Local governments
Box   118
Role of the states in government of the country
Box   118
Structure, and administrative departments
Box   118
Wisconsin state government problems
Subseries: Industrial Relations
Industrial Education
Box   119
Apprenticeship
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   119
General
Box   119
Labor (worker's) education
Box   119
Trade schools, private
Injunctions
Box   120
Damage actions against unions
Box   120
Damage suits against labor unions
Box   120
Federal court injunctions against unions on complaint of employers or public officials
Box   120
Federal injunctions, general
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Injunctions in labor disputes
Box   120
Federal courts, Volume I
Box   121
State court injunctions against unions, Volume I (continued from box 120)
Box   121
Issued against unions at instance of employers or the government, Volume II
Box   121
Other than actions by employers
Box   121
State courts, actions against labor unions at the instance of employer or government in which no injunctions were issued
Box   122
State courts, injunctions after 1950
Box   122
Wisconsin injunctions
Labor History
Box   122
American Federation of Labor
Box   122
Congress of Industrial Organizations
Box   122
Industrial democracy
Box   122
International trade unionism
Box   122
Labor movement in theory
Box   123
Labor union finances and dues
Box   123
Labor unions and industrial peace
Box   123
Labor unity, AFL-CIO
Box   123
Politics of trade unionism
Box   123
Structure: craft vs. industrial, jurisdictional disputes
Trade unionism
Box   123
Early history
Box   124
In the New Deal period
Box   124
In World War II (in U.S.)
Box   124
Pro and con
Box   125
Value to employers
Box   125
Union practices
Box   125
Union responsibility to public
Box   125
Various unions
Box   125
White collar employees
Box   125
Wisconsin's labor movement
Labor in Politics
Box   126
Earliest period to 1890
Box   126
1890-1905
Box   126
1905-1919
Box   126
1919-1932
Box   126
1933-1942
Box   127
1943-1947
Box   127
1947-circa 1951
Box   127
1952 campaign
Box   127
1952-1960
Box   128
Foreign labor parties
Box   128
General
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   128
Lobbying, legislative activities
Box   128
Maps showing voting of Union Labor Party, 1880s
Box   128
Miscellaneous topics
Box   128
Unions and the Taft-Hartley Act
Labor Law
Anti-trust cases against unions and leaders
Box   129
General
Box   129
After 1836
Box   129
Enforcement
Box   129
Martial law, and the law on strikes
Box   129
Norris-LaGuardia anti-injunction laws
Box   130
Picketing
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Policy questions
Box   130
Regarding industrial relations
Box   130
Regarding regulation of internal union affairs
Box   130
Regarding restrictions on unions
Box   130
Regarding right to strike and limitations
Box   131
Regarding union incorporation and responsibility, suability of unions
Box   131
Regarding union relations to their members, intra-union rows
Box   131
Regarding union responsibility under trade agreements--no strike provisions
Box   131
Public emergencies caused by strikes (other then public utility strikes)
Box   131
Public employees and unionism
Box   132
Public employment, collective bargaining adjustment grievances
Box   132
Property rights involved in labor cases
Box   132
Summaries of current law
Box   132
Statutes concerning labor combinations
Box   132
Working papers for “Labor and the Law”
Box   132
“Yellow Dog” contracts
Labor Legislation
Box   133
Administration
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   133
Administration, U.S. Department of Labor
Box   133
Anti-injunction legislation before 1930
Box   133
Anti-injunction legislation after 1930
Box   134
Book, proposed chapters
Child labor
Box   134
Federal legislation
Box   134
In agriculture
Box   134
In wartime
Box   134
Laws, state and foreign
Box   135
Need for restriction
Box   135
Street trades
Box   135
Treble compensation
Box   135
Employment contract
Box   135
Fair employment practices legislation
Fair Labor Standards Act
Box   136
History
Box   136
1935 proposals for changes
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   137
Farmers and protective labor legislation
Box   137
Federal anti-injunction bill, 1928
Box   137
Foreign countries, general; United Nations, Economic and Social Council
Box   137
General
Box   138
History, proponents and opponents
Box   138
Hobbs Anti-Racketeering Act, 1946
Box   138
Home work and sweat shop labor
Hours
Box   138
Studies of problems
Box   138
Women's hours legislation
Box   139
Immigration and naturalization
Box   139
In foreign countries
Box   139
Injunction bills in Congress, 1895-1932
Note: Witte wrote on the original folder, “Important.”
Box   139
International action on labor legislation, particularly the I.L.O.
Labor in wartime
Box   139
Foreign countries
Box   140
Hours
Box   140
Labor legislation in Wisconsin
Box   140
Labor relations, development, 1947-1948
Labor relations, legislation
Box   140
Legal cases arising under restrictive state laws
Box   140
Positions of different groups and discussion of problems, 1947
Box   140
Landrum-Griffin Act, 1959
Box   140
Lea Act, 1946 (anti-Petrillo bill)
Box   140
Legal aid
Box   140
Legal basis, effects
Box   141
Men's hours, legislation (including movement for the 8-hour day)
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   141
Migratory workers, problems of
Box   141
National Labor Relations Act, first NLRB, 1931 May-1935 July
Box   141
National Labor Relations Act, second NLRB, 1935-1936, developments up to Supreme Court decision
National Labor Relations Board
Box   141
“Appropriate bargaining unit” issue
Box   142
Changes proposed, 1937-1941
Box   142
Developments in , 1940-1941 sessions of Congress
Box   142
Evaluation
Box   142
General, 1942
Box   143
Interpretation
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   143
Interpretation of Section 7(a)
Box   143
Legislative proposals terminating in act of , 1935
Box   144
Policy issues
Box   144
Trade agreements
Box   144
Status
Box   144
Union obligations, restrictions, employer interference, collective bargaining
Box   144
New Deal Board, 1931
Box   145
Norris-LaGuardia Act
Box   145
Price and wage controls, 1952
Box   145
Prison labor
Box   145
Public employees, laws regulating
Box   145
Public utilities
Box   145
Public utility strike legislation other than Wisconsin
Box   146
Railroad and maritime labor acts
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   146
Railroad employees, special laws
Box   146
Restrictive legislation, proposals in Congress, 1945-1947
Box   147
Right to work laws
Safety and sanitation
Box   147
Coal mines
Box   147
General
Safety
Box   147
Application of safety laws
Box   148
Employment prohibited to women
Box   148
Fire prevention
Box   148
Industrial diseases
Box   148
Safety laws and their administration
Box   148
Seamen's labor laws
Box   148
Standards
States
Box   148
Hours of labor for men
Box   149
Labor relations
Box   149
Safety and sanitation legislation
Box   149
Summaries of legislation
Taft-Hartley Act
Box   149
Analysis
Box   149
Appraisal and operation of the law
Box   150
Boycotts
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   150
Coal industry disputes after T-H Act
Box   150
Collective bargaining
Box   151
Communist affidavit requirements
Box   151
Company union cases and favoritism
Box   151
Congressional Labor-Management Committee, 1947-1952
Box   151
Damage suits
Box   151
Developments affecting T-H after passage, 1947 July
Box   151
Discrimination against union members
Box   151
Effects on employees
Box   152
Emergency strikes (exclusive of coal)
Box   152
Employers, rights of free speech before and after T-H
Box   152
Featherbedding
Box   152
Health, welfare, and pension plans
Box   152
Injunctions
Box   152
Interpretations and forecasts of effects
Box   152
Jurisdictional disputes
Box   153
Labor developments subsequent to passage of the Act but not directly related to it
Box   153
McClellan investigations. Labor scandals, 1957
Box   153
Miscellaneous specific provisions of the T-H Act, and their effects
Box   153
NLRB jurisdiction under T-H
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   153-154
NLRB under T-H Act
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   154
Picketing
Box   154
Procedural issues
Box   154
Proposals for changes
Box   154
Representation questions under T-H
Note: Includes craft severance.
Box   154
State-federal relations under T-H
Box   155
Strikes after passage of the Act, 1947
Box   155
Strikes--legal questions
Box   155
Supervisory employees and plant guards
Box   155
Union coercion, violence, et cetera
Box   155
Union reaction and policies after passage of the T-H Act
Box   156
80th Congress, proposals for changes
Physical Description: 4 folders 
Box   156
81st Congress, proposals for changes
Box   157
83rd Congress, proposals for changes
Box   157
83rd and 84th Congresses, labor relations legislation
Box   157
85th Congress, labor relations legislation
Box   157
86th Congress, proposals for changes
Box   157
Theory
Box   157
Union labor, preference to
Box   157
Union regulation in labor disputes
Wages
Box   158
Minimum wages, effects and arguments
Box   158
Minimum wages, general
Box   158
Minimum wage legislation for minors, apprenticeship
Box   158
Minimum wage legislation, methods of administration
Box   158
Minimum wage legislation, U.S., general
Box   158-159
Minimum wage scale and minimum wage movement in the U.S.
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   159
Public Contracts Act, prevailing wage
Box   159
Regulation for men
Note: Existing legislation--foreign and American.
Box   159
Wage payment and collection laws
Box   159
Women's Equal Rights Amendment, equal pay for equal work laws
Box   159
Women's hours of labor, flexible
Box   159
Women's hours of labor and wages
Note: Wisconsin pea canneries.
Box   160
Women's wages
Box   160
Women's work in industry, general
Box   160
Wisconsin “employment peace act,” data on operation of the law
Box   160
Wisconsin “employment peace act,” 1939
Box   160
Wisconsin labor relations, changes in the law after 1939, and proposed changes
Labor-Management Relations
Box   161
Changes in labor conditions
Box   161
Conference, 1945 December
Box   161
Cooperation
Box   161
Developments and trends
Box   162
Employer associations
Box   162
Employer ideas and policies
Box   162
Employers and collective bargaining
Box   162
Essentials for satisfactory relations
Box   163
Management rights as an issue in collective bargaining
Box   163
Personnel management
Box   163
Psychology
Box   163
Sociologists approach
Box   163
Welfare
Labor Problems
Box   164
Arbitration
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   164
Compulsory
Box   164
General
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Arbitration
Box   165
Handling by state boards
Box   165
History of
Box   165
Issues, notes on decisions
Box   165
Municipal labor boards
Box   165
U.S. Conciliation Service to 1947, and Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service after 1947
Box   165
Its influences on guaranteed wages and social changes
Box   166
Automation, its influence on guaranteed wages and social changes
Box   166
Boycotts
Box   166
Collective bargaining
Box   166
General
Box   167
History, theory, legal nature
Box   167
Industry-wide bargaining
Box   167
In operation, appraisals
Box   167
In particular industries
Box   167
“Portal to Portal” pay, travel time, clothes changing
Box   168
Productivity
Box   168
Contracts, modification and extension
Box   168
Disputes in Wisconsin
Box   168
Disputes, public policy
Box   168
Employment market
Box   168-169
Employment of older people
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Employment offices
Box   169
Private
Box   169
Public
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   169
Employment planning by government
Box   170
Employment relations in Wisconsin
Box   170
Employment services in foreign countries
Box   170
Employment statistics
Box   170
Fringe benefits
Box   171
General
Box   171
Government labor relation policies
Grievance adjustments
Box   171
Including arbitration, NWLB
Box   171
Machinery in trade agreements
Box   172
Guaranteed wages and employment
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Guaranteed wages and employment
Box   173
Actual plans
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   173
Including severance and dismissal pay
Box   173
Insurance
Box   173
Hours
Housing
Box   173
Foreign countries
Box   174
U.S.
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   174
Independent company unions, employee representation
Box   174
Independent company unions under NIRA (1 and 2)
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   175
Industrial spying and private detective agencies
Box   175
Injunctions in labor disputes
Box   175
Labor statistics
Box   176
Labor unionism, general
Box   176
Methods of coping with unemployment
Box   176
Picketing
Box   176
Productivity, problems and trends
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   177
Profit-sharing
Box   177
Public employee, rights as an employee
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   177
Racketeering
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   178
Seniority
Box   178
Stabilization of employment
Strikes
Box   178
General aspects
Box   178
Their social significance
Box   178
Employment of strikebreakers
Box   178
Sit-down and other anti-social strikes
Box   178-179
Statistics
Box   179
Unemployment before World War II
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   179
Unemployment during and after World War I
Box   180
Unionization of foremen
Box   180
Violence in disputes
Box   180
Wage issues, labor and employee positions
Box   180
Wage statistics
Box   181
Wage theories
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   182
Wages, union policies
Labor Relations in Foreign Countries
Box   182
Australia and New Zealand
Box   182
Canada
Box   182
Hawaii
Box   183
General
Box   183
Great Britain
Box   183
Labor law (except British, Canadian, Australian)
Box   184
Latin America
Box   184
Occupied countries after World War II
Box   184
Post World War II
Note: Other than occupied countries.
Box   184
Scandinavian
Box   184
Soviet Union
Box   184
Western Germany
Labor Relations in Postwar Period
Box   185
Disputes, adjustments after V-J Day
Box   185
Disputes, fact-finding boards, 1945-1946
Box   185
General
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   185
Policy discussions, 1945 August-1946 December
Box   186
Strikes: coal strike, 1947 July
Wage controls
Box   186
Controversies and agreements
Box   186
Government action
Box   186
Policies and discussions prior to V-J Day
Box   186
Policies and discussions following V-J Day
Labor Relations in Wartime
Box   187
General
Korean War
Defense Production Act
Box   187
1950
Box   187
1951
Box   187
Inflation situation
Box   187
Labor disputes, 1950-1952
Box   187
Labor disputes and WSB action
Box   187
Labor in defense effort, 1950-1951
Box   187
Price stabilization
Box   188
Steel disputes and strike, 1951
Box   188
Reconstituted Wage Stabilization Board
Box   188
Wage stabilization and first Wage Stabilization Board
Box   189
Wage Stabilization Board -- orders and interpreters
Box   189
Wage Stabilization Committee, 1952 December-1953 March
Box   189
War mobilization -- manpower problems, 1950
Box   189
War mobilization plans, circa 1950
Box   190
Meat packing industry, Chicago
NWLB
Box   190
And independent unions
Box   190
Disputes cases
Box   190
Jurisdiction
Box   190
Policy of strikes and threatened strikes
Box   190
Representation and recognition
Box   191
Railway labor
Box   191
World War I
World War II
Box   191
Adjustments of labor disputes
Box   191
General
Box   191
Labor problems before Congress previous to Smith-Connally Act
Box   191
Mediation
Box   191
National defense, 1940
Box   192
Mediation proposals, 1940-1941
Box   192
Right to strike, restrictions after Pearl Harbor
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   192
Smith-Connally Act
Box   193
Strikes and near strikes
Box   193
Strikes subsequent to Smith-Connally Act
Box   193
Wage problems
Labor Union Policy Issues
Box   193-194
Communism in the unions
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   194
Disputes between unions
Box   194
Farmers, attitudes
Box   194
Labor's support of education
Box   195
Monopoly and the unions
State Labor Relations
Box   195
Labor union policy issues -- monopoly and unions, non-legal aspects
Box   195
Legislative proposals, 1946-1947
Box   195
“Little Wagner” acts
Box   195-196
Restrictive acts by states
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   196
Wisconsin Labor Relations Act, 1936-1939
Union Security
Box   196-197
After passage of Taft-Hartley Act (other than NLRB and court cases)
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   197
As an issue before NWLB
Box   198
Cases before NWLB
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   198
Check-off of union dues
Box   198
Closed shop and open shop issues
Subseries: Social Security
Advisory Council
Box   198
Miscellaneous reports and recommendations, 1947-1952
Box   199
Recommendations, 1937-1939
Box   199
Studies and reports, 1937-1939
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Children's Security
Box   200
Aid to dependent children regarding mother pensions
Box   200
Crippled children's services
Box   200
Family allowances
Box   200-201
Historical and general
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   201
Committee on Economic Security: General
Disability Insurance
Box   201
Cash sickness compensation
Box   201
Cash sickness insurance
General
Box   202
Administration, federal and state
Box   202
Articles and discussions
Box   202
Development of social security
Box   202
Economic security, general approaches
Box   202
Farmers and farm workers, social security for
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   203
Financial data
Insurance
Box   203
Group and auto
Box   203
Life and industrial
Box   203
Miscellaneous
Box   203
Need for social security
Box   204
Objectives of social security
Box   204
Payroll taxes, incidence and effect
Box   204
Philosophy of social security
Box   204
Public welfare organizations, state and local
Box   204
Social assistance
Box   204
Social insurance
Box   205
Social Security Act, defense of the law
Box   205
Social security development, appraisal and prospects
Box   205
Social security legislation, effects
Box   205
Social work and social security
Box   205
Statistical data
Box   205
“Welfare State” and social security
Health Insurance
Box   206
Compulsory
Box   206
Disability insurance
Box   206
Health security data
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   206
Medical care for public assistance recipients
Box   206
Medical service plans in industry
Box   207
National health programs
Box   207
Pros and cons
Box   207
Public health services
Box   207-208
Sickness risk, statistical
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   208
Voluntary health insurance, general
Box   208-209
Voluntary pre-payment
Physical Description: 4 folders 
History of Health Security
Box   209
Campaigns of , 1948-1952
Compulsory health insurance
Box   209
History
Box   209
Movement, 1936
Box   209
Developments, 1952-1953
Box   209
Disability and health insurance
Box   210
Health aspects of Wagner-Murray-Dingell Bill, 1943-1945
Box   210
Health insurance in Wisconsin
Health security proposals
Box   210
1945
Box   210
1947-1949
Box   210
1950
Box   211
1953-1956
Box   211
General
Box   211
Hospitalization benefits, Ewing proposals, 1951
Box   211
Legislative developments, general
Box   211
National health program, 1938-1942
Box   212
President's Commission on Health Needs of the Nation
Box   212
Proposals favorable to health insurance, 1950
Box   212
Proposals on the federal level, 1935-1945
Box   212
Public Health Service
Box   212
Voluntary health insurance
History of Social Security
Box   212
Committee on Economic Security, 1934-1935, and Social Security Act, , 1935
Box   213
Freezing “payroll taxes” in the 1940s
Box   213
General developments after , 1935
Box   213
History through proposed changes in Social Security Act, 1940-1953
Box   214
Labor and social security legislation
Box   214
Old age security legislation
Box   214
Social Security Act
Box   214
Social Security Board, work and progress under the act of 1935
Box   214
Social security legislation
Legislation and Development
Box   215
Arden House Conference on Social Security, 1953
Box   215
Bills in Congress other than administrative--Townsend and Lundeen Bills, 1934-1935
Box   215
Changes in OASI, 1949
Box   215
Changes in social assistance legislation, 1949
Box   215
Compilation of social security laws, 1954, 1956, 1958
Box   215
Congress' universal pension proposals, et cetera, 1949
Box   215
Employer programs, 1941-1945
Box   215
Miscellaneous proposals for changes in the Social Security Act
Box   215
National Resources Planning Board, 1942-1943
Box   216
Social security legislation, historical material
Social Security Act, 1935
Box   216
History and ideas
Box   216
Amendments proposed, 1930s
Box   216
Amendments proposed and passed, 1930s
Box   216
Amendments proposed by unofficial groups, 1930s
Box   217
Amendments proposed by Congress, 1939-1940
Box   217
Amendments proposed, 1945
Box   217
Amendments, 1946
Box   217
Amendments discussed by 81st Congress, 1949
Box   217
Amendments, 1950
Box   217
Amendments proposed in H.R. 600, 1950-1951
Box   217
Amendments, 1952
Box   217
Amendments proposed, 1952-1954
Box   218
Amendments proposed, 1954
Box   218
Amendments of , 1954
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   218
Amendments proposed, 1955-1956
Box   219
Amendments of , 1956
Box   219
Amendments regarding OASI, 1956
Box   219
Amendments proposed and passed, 1958
Box   219
Changes proposed, 1939, unofficial
Box   219
Changes in the 1940s, historical material
Box   219
Changes proposed, 1941-1942
Box   220
Changes proposed, 1941-1942, unofficial
Box   220
Changes proposed after , 1942
Box   220
Changes proposed by administration, 1943-1945
Box   220
Changes proposed, 1943-1945, and the campaign for passage of amendments
Box   220
Changes proposed by administration, 1953-1954
Box   220
Changes proposed by Democratic party and Labor, 1953-1954
Box   220
Changes proposed by U.S. Chamber of Commerce, 1953-1954
Box   221
Changes proposed in health security, 1954-1958
Box   221
Comments in, 1939
Box   221
Congressional hearings after passage of the original act, 1935-1939
Box   221
Curtis subcommittee of House Ways and Means Committee, on H.R. 6863, 1953-1954
Old Age Security
Box   222
Civil Service retirement system
Box   222
Developments in old age assistance after , 1935
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   222
Federal OASI after , 1954
Box   223
Federal OASI after 1954, views of “experts” and critics
Box   223
Financing, tax rates, et cetera
Box   223
Legislation on the old age problem, other than social security
Box   223
Old age assistance in California
Box   223
Old age insurance, 1935 law and policy questions
OASI
Box   224
Coverage
Box   224
Eligibility and benefit problems; retirement age; survivors and dependents benefits
Box   224
Financial aspects
Box   224-225
Reserves
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   225
Under the Social Security Act
Box   225
Pension plans and annuities (churches, trade, veterans)
Box   225
Population trends and problems
Public employees
Box   225
Inclusion in social security
Box   226
Retirement plans (other than teachers)
Box   226
Railroad retirement plans
Box   226
Retirement of older workers
Box   227
Teachers, retirement plans
Box   227
Wisconsin, data peculiar to
Box   227
Personnel, general
Physically Handicapped
Box   227
Disability insurance under OASI
Box   227
Disabled permanently and totally
Box   227
Security for the blind
Box   227-228
Vocational rehabilitation
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   228
Health and welfare funds
Box   228
Industrial pension, health, welfare plans
Box   228
Industrial pensions
Box   229
Investigations of health, welfare and pension funds
Box   229
Pension and welfare funds under wage stabilization
Box   229
Public regulation of health, welfare and pension plans
Box   229
Sick leave, group insurance, pension plans--War Labor Board
Box   229
Social security by contract--collective bargaining
Box   230
Union-company joint health, welfare, and pension plans
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   230
UAW health, welfare, and pension plans
Public Assistance
Box   230
Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)
Box   230
Direct relief (state and local) after Federal Emergency Relief Act (F.E.R.A.) and prior to World War II
Box   231
Emergency employment and wages
Box   231
Federal Emergency Relief Act (FERA)
Box   231
Federal Emergency Relief Act, work programs and CWA
Box   231
Food stamp plan
Box   231
General
Box   232
History of relief previous to depression of 1930s
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   232
National Youth Administration (NYA)
Box   232
Proposals for permanent relief program
Box   232
Public works plans for foreign countries
Box   233
Relief during the depression of the 1930s
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   233
Relief in relation to social insurance
Box   233
Rural rehabilitation (FSA, Resettlement Administration, et cetera)
Box   234
Works Progress Administration (WPA)
Radical Plans
Box   234
General Welfare Act, H.R. 5620; H.R. 4199; H.R. 1410
Box   234
Miscellaneous
Box   234
Social credit movement
Box   235
Townsend Plan I, before 1938
Box   235
Townsend Plan after 1938, and “baby” Townsend Plan
Box   235
Social Security and Politics: Campaigns, 1936, 1938, 1940
Social Security Board
Box   236
General
Box   236
Social Security Act, changes recommended by the Board, 1939
Social Security in Foreign Countries
Box   236
All foreign plans
Box   236
Australia and New Zealand
Box   236-237
Canada
Physical Description: 4 folders 
England
Box   237
Law of , 1948 and its operation
Box   237
National Health Service to , 1948
Box   238
Prior to Beveridge Report
Box   238
Beveridge Report and postwar social security
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   238
Unemployment insurance
Box   239
France
Box   239
Germany
Box   239
Health insurance, general
Box   239
International action
Box   239
International comparisons
Box   239
Japan
Box   239
Latin America
Box   239
Old age security in foreign countries, general
Box   239
Public assistance in foreign countries, general
Box   240
Russia
Box   240
Scandinavia
Box   240
Social insurance in foreign countries, general
Box   240
Socialized medicine, developments abroad
Box   241
Unemployment insurance other than England and Canada
Box   241
World War II
Social Security in the States
Box   241
Public welfare in Wisconsin, also social security
Box   241-242
Relief in Wisconsin, problems and program
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   242
Wisconsin and social security
Social Security in Wartime
Box   242
Korean War, 1950
World War II
Box   242
Aid to soldiers
Box   242
Developments in social security
Unemployment Insurance
Box   242
Benefits, adequacy of dependents allowances
Box   243
Benefits and taxes
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   243
Changes at state level, 1949
Box   243
Changes by 83rd Congress, 1951-1952
Box   243
Changes proposed prior to , 1945
Box   244
Compensation: federal-state relations, other than issue of Federalization
Box   244
Compensation in the U.S. after enactment of state laws (excluding New York and Wisconsin)
Box   244
Coverage problems
Box   244
Disqualifications
Experience rating
Box   244
1937-1940
Box   245
1941-1947
Box   245
After , 1947
Box   245
Federal unemployment insurance law changes, 1937-1945
Box   245
Federalization
Box   245
Finances and tax rates
Box   246
Fraud and malingering
Box   246
Historical data since , 1935
Box   246
Interstate migration and claims
Legislative developments
Box   246
1944-1945
Box   246
1953-1957
Box   246
1959
Box   246
Lundeen-Frazier Bill
Box   247
Miscellaneous
Box   247
Operation and effects
Box   247
Private plans
Proposals for Social Security Act
Box   247
Wagner-Lewis Bill, 1932-1935
Box   248
1934-1935
Box   248
Railroad employees, dismissal wages
Box   248
Reinsurance
Box   248
Relief as related to unemployment
Box   248
Seasonal and partial employment
Box   248
State developments during World War II, 1942-1945
Box   248
State laws
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   249
Strikes and strike jobs
Box   249
Supplemental unemployment benefits
Box   249
Temporary insurance: recession of , 1957-1959
Box   249
Unemployment compensation in the Social Security Act
Box   249
Unemployment compensation law changes, 1931-1941
Box   249
War displacement benefits
Box   250
Wisconsin unemployment law of 1934
Box   250
Wisconsin unemployment law, early years
Box   250
Wisconsin unemployment insurance after , 1938
Veterans' Security
Box   250
Disabled veterans
Box   250
Unemployment insurance for veterans
Box   251
Veterans' benefits
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   251
Veterans' problems
Workmen's Compensation
Box   251
Compensation and accident insurance in foreign countries
Box   251-252
History of workmen's compensation
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   252
Insurance
Box   252-253
Non-insurance under workmen's compensation
Physical Description: 3 folders 
Box   253
Occupational diseases
Box   253
Railroad employees
Box   253
States (other than Wisconsin)
Box   254
Status and problems, 1950s
Box   254
Theory and purpose
Series: Miscellaneous Files
Arrangement of the Materials: Arranged alphabetically, by type of material
Subseries: Articles and Addresses
Box   254
Authors other than Witte, 1934-1958, 1963
Box   254
Clippings regarding Witte articles and addresses, 1917-1956
Box   254
Economics, economic problems, taxation, 1926-1957
Box   254
Government, and government and business, 1925-1957
Industrial relations
Box   255
1909-1929
Box   255
1930-1939
Box   255
1940-1946
Box   255
1947
Box   256-256A
1948
Box   256-256A
1949-1951
Box   256-256A
1952-1953
Box   256-256A
1951-1960
Box   257
Miscellaneous articles and addresses by Witte, 1924-1960
Social Security
Box   257
1921-1935
Box   257
1936
Box   257
1937-1938
Box   257
1939
Box   258
1940
Box   258
1941-1944
Box   258
1945-1949
Box   258
1950-1951
Box   259
1952-1953
Box   259
1955-1956
Box   259
1957-1959
Wisconsin
Box   259
1921-1934
Box   260
1935-1953
Subseries: Bibliographies
Box   260
Government publications in the Witte library
Box   260
Non-government publications in the Witte library
Box   260
Witte on injunctions and trade union law [articles and addresses listed by Mrs. Witte before papers were given to the State Historical Society]
Box   260
Witte on social security [articles and addresses listed by Mrs. Witte before papers were given to the State Historical Society]
Subseries: Class lectures
Box   260
Economic problems in Wisconsin, 1933-1940
Government and business
Box   260
1949-1950
Box   261
1959-1960
Government and labor
Box   261
1937-1940
Box   261
1940-1941
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   262
1941-1943
Box   262
Miscellaneous notes and lectures
Box   262
Government economic problems, seminar, 1940-1941
Government in the economy, role of
Box   262
1957
Box   262
General
Box   263
Government in the states, 1946-1947, 1953
Labor problems
Box   263
1946-1947, 1953
Box   263
1955
Box   264
Legislation lectures, 1947
Social insurance
Box   264
1935-1936
Box   264
1937-1938
Box   264
1939-1942
Box   265
1941-1942, 1945-1946
Social security
Box   265
1940-1950
Box   265
1947-1950, 1954-1955
Box   265
1950-1951
Box   266
1958-1959
Physical Description: 2 folders 
Box   266
1960
Box   266
Economics of, 1957
Box   267
Bibliographies, outlines, readings, 1941-1958
Box   267
Seminar data, 1938, 1947
Box   267
Seminars, 1940-1957
Box   267
Trade unionism and the law, undated
Subseries: Manuscript
Box   268
“The Courts and Labor Disputes,” a manuscript copy of Witte's Ph.D. dissertation, with added notes, undated
Subseries: Studies and Compilations
Arrangement of the Materials: Arranged chronologically, by month
Box   268
Economics, government, industrial relations, social security, 1924-1956
Wisconsin
Box   268
1922-1925
Box   268
1926-1934
Subseries: Student Reports
Box   269
Economics
Box   269
Government in the economy
Box   270-272
Industrial relations
Box   272-274
Social security
Box   275
Wisconsin
Series: Card Files
Note: Reboxed, but filed just as Witte kept them.
Government
Box   276
Government and business
Economics
Box   276
Theory and history
Industrial Relations
Box   277-278
Adjustment of labor disputes
Box   278
Labor law, foreign
Box   279
Injunctions
Box   280
Labor law I
Box   281
Labor law II
Box   282
Labor in politics
Box   282
Labor legislation
Box   283-287
Labor problems
Box   288
Trade unionism
Social Security
Box   289
General, in U.S. and in foreign countries
Box   290(a)-290(c)
Health security
Box   290(a)-290(c)
Unemployment security
Box   291(a)-291(c)
Workmen's compensation
Box   291(a)-291(c)
Relief and public works
Box   291(a)-291(c)
Old age security
Box   292
General