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Rappel, Joseph J. / A centennial history of the Manitowoc County school districts and its public school system, 1848-1948
([1948])

Meeme,   pp. 142-153 PDF (5.2 MB)


Page 147


     The Osman school has always been a one-room school. During the 1890's,
the
 enrollment was between 70 and 100 pupils. The average enrollment in recent
years
 has been about 20 pupils. The decrease in enrollment in recent years is
due to smaller
 families and to the building of the parochial school in the village of Osman
in 1925.
     Some of the graduates of the Osman school who became local and county
leaders
 were Michael Kirwan who became Circuit Judge; James Kirwan, Circuit Judge
of
 Calumet County; Jos. Connell, the first highway commissioner of Manitowoc
County
 and income assessor; John Nagle, who became county superintendent of schools;
 Peter Burns, a Chicago doctor; Luke Burns, a lawyer; Jos. Peppard, who became
prin-
 cipal of a school in Milwaukee; the McMahons, and many others of wtiom there
are
 no definite records. Some of the noted "teacher" families were
the Sullivans, Schnei-
 ders, Hobans, Carys, Egans, Hayes's, Fitzgeralds, Conways, Holfeltzes, Pintprs,
and
'the Millers.
     The first district clerk was M. Mulholland, and the first director was
John Stuart.
 Some of the other early officers were H. Mulholland, Patrick McEnering,
Dennis
 Nagle, Anton Walterbach, Michael Gallogly, and Patrick McMahon. The first
officers
 were paid one dollar per year. In 1907 their salaries were raised to five
dollars
 yearly.
     John Stuart, the first teacher, received fourteen dollars per month
for three
 months. Some of the teachers after him were William Goodwin, Patrick O'Shea,
H.
 Mulholland, John Cary, Patrick Nagle, Mary Richardson, James Kirwan, Katie
Demp-
 sey, Peter Burns, Verona O'Grady, J. W. Hogan, Katie Egan, Julia Hayes,
Katie Hayes,
 Nell Cary, Tom Walsh, Teresa Hoban, Lizzie Peppard, Nellie Brady, Katie
Finnegan,
 M. H. Garry, Elizabeth Fitzgerald, Mary Conway, Lizzie Schneider, and C.
J. Mol-
 denhauer. The demand for Irish teachers is very apparent.
     Some of the subjects taught in the early years were orthography, reading,
gram-
 mar, geography, and United States history. Many pupils from the surrounding
dis-
 tricts came to the Osman school to get the required subjects necessary to
acquire a
 teaching certificate.
     The early settlers banded together to form a society which is still
the subject of
 conversation for old-timers. This was the Temperance Society sponsored by
the
 "Old Irish Society". They had a hall in Osman which was known
as Temperance
 Hall. Christmas programs and St. Patrick's Day parties were held in it.
It also serv-
 ed as a meeting place for the society. This hall was later moved from its
original site,
 and it is now used as a barn.
                     MEEME NO. 4 -MINERAL SPRINGS
                                    Olga Voss
    Meeme District [No. 4 was
given the name "Mineral
Springs School" in 1918 be-
cause of the many springs with
high iron content found in that
vicinity. To many of the older
residents of the county and of
the community, this school was
often called the "Liberty Pole
School" because it is situated
near the Liberty Pole. To the
real "old-timers" it was known
as the Danforth School because
of the many connections that
the Danforth family had with
the early history of the school,
and as the Welsh school because
the district was settled largely
by Welsh immigrants.
     On September 24, 1853, at one o'clock P. M. the voters of this district
met in the
 schoolhouse of District No. 2 (Spring Valley) and voted to build a schoolhouse
in their
 own district. Evidently the pupils of this vicinity had attended the Spring
Valley
 School. T. G. Jenkins was chosen as the first clerk, W. Danforth director,
and J. Dan-
-forth treasurer. It was decided to lay a tax of one dollar on each eighty
acres to
finance the new building and to pay other expenses. It was also decided that
a three
month school term beginning about the first of December be maintained and
that a
female teacher be employed. Miss Lucetta Danforth was the first teacher employed.
147


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