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Commemorative biographical record of the Fox River Valley counties of Brown, Outagamie and Winnebago : containing biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens, and of many of the early settled families
(1895)

Biographical,   pp. [unnumbered]-[1232] PDF (429.7 MB)


Page 571


COMMEMORATIVE BIOGRAPIICAL RECORD.
57'
Rhine. He received a practical education,
and, like his father, was reared on a farm,
where he remained until 1856 when, with
his p)arents, he embarked on the " Chim-
borazo," and after thirty-six days on the
water, landed at New York. Coming
directly to Granville, Milvaukee Co.,
Wis., they here purchased eighty acres of
timbered land, upon which they located
and engaged in clearing, preparatory to
cultivation. There they remained four
years, but the mother dying, our subject
moved to Madison, Wis., where he
secured work on a farm until the autumn
of 1862, when he married Miss Elizabeth
Nettecoven, who wa5 born in Prussia, in
October, i839. She has borne him nine
children as follows: Annie, John M.,
Joseph H., Conrad, Francis, Hubert,
Lizzie, Henry and Maggie, all of whom
are living except Conrad and Francis.
After his marriage our subject and wife
resided on a rented farm for one year,
then went to Ellington, Outagamie county,
where he purchased sixty acres of tim-
bered land, and for the next few years he
worked hard and continuously, felling
trees, grubbing out stumps, burning brush
and getting the ground in a condition for
crops.  Later he bought eighty acres
adjoining his land, which makes a nice
farm of 14o acres; it is now all under
cultivation and contains good buildings,
fences, etc. His path has not been strewn
with roses; he has had to work hard for
everything he now possesses, yet he never
allowed himself to be discouraged, but
continued to work despite the disad-
vantages under which he labored. He
can now afford to take life easy, and reap
the fruits of his past hard labor. He is a
good practical farmer, and his crops are
the admiration of all his neighbors.
   In politics Mr. Fassebnder is an In-
dependent.   He has held the office of
chairman on the township board, and is
now serving as justice of the peace in his
fourth year, and at present (1895) is post-
master at Bungert. He is always among
the first to further any movement which
will benefit the public, and his influence
in such matters is such that whatever he
endorses is sure to receive the approba-
tion of his neighbors. In religion he has
accepted the creed of his forefathers as
far back as can be traced, and is a promi-
nent member of the Roman Catholic
Church.
ENRY          DAVID    HARI)ACKER,
       M. D., physician and surgeon,
       Hortonville, Outagamnie county,
       was born April 16, 1846, in Mus-
kego township, Waukesha Co., Wis.
On the side of his father his ancestors
were English, while his mother was prob-
ably of German descent.
   His grandfather Hardacker was a sea-
faring man, whose home was in Chester,
N. S., but was lost at sea while on
a trip to Boston. His w\-idow for a short
time resided   in Ellington  township,
Outagamie county, and after an absence
of two years returned to Nova Scotia,
where she died at the age of nearly
eighty-five years. She was the mother
of a large family of children who became
excellent men and women. Her son,
James Hardacker, father of our subject,
was   born  in  Chester, N. S., and
was there married to Eliza Wickware, a
native of the same province, who died in
Ellington township, Wis. She was an
energetic, stirring woman, of strong will
power and firniess of character, and was
the mother of nine children-seven sonls
and two daughters. One son, Isaac M.,
was a soldier (luring the war of the Re-
hellion, and was with Gen. Sherman in
the famous march to the sea. The father,
who was a farmer by occupation, Was
but fort) years of age at the time of his
death, which was caused by a paralytic
stroke, and three of the sons died at the
respective ages of twenty, twemity -seven
and thirty-two years. All of the survxiv
ing sons, except the I)octor, are farmers.
    Henry D. Hardacker, the subject of
of this sketch, was but tw\(o xyears of age


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