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University of Wisconsin. College of Agriculture / Winter courses in agriculture for farm boys--1929-30
([1930])

Departments of instruction,   pp. 27-38 ff. PDF (2.4 MB)


Page 28


THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
  A. Farm Bookkeeping. Elementary principles of economics
and the elements of bookkeeping as applied to the farm. Meth-
ods of taking farm inventories and the keeping of cash ac-
counts, and accounts with livestock, farm crops, etc. Mr. Bell.
  B. Farm Economics. This course will consist of lectures and
discussions which deal with subjects with which the farmers
are in constant contact; how prices are made, the farmers'
purchasing power, farm labor, farm credit, farm tenancy and
leases. Mr. Wehrwein.
  C. Marketing. This course includes a study of necessary
marketing services, agencies, and methods; and analysis of
merchandising principles applied to agriculture, a discussion of
cooperative marketing and the middleman system, as well as
a consideration of market prices, marketing weaknesses, and
marketing improvements. The relationship between econom-
ical production, quality products, efficient and effective mar-
keting, and better rural social life is pointed out. Mr. Bakken.
  D. Rural Community Organization. Social and economic re-
lations of farm home and community are studied together
with numerous methods for their improvement. Various local
social institutions such as school, club, store, church, and li-
brary are given special attention. Particular emphasis is also
given to types of farmers' clubs and community organizations,
with suggestions and plans for making them a success. Mr.
Kolb and Mr. Nelson.
  E. Farm Management. To show the student how the var-
ious farm operations may be organized and correlated so the
entire farm may be handled successfully and economically.
The location and size of the farm and its adaptability to the
raising of crops and livestock, the layout of the farm, the capi-
tal and equipment necessary for the various types of farming
and the problem of farm help. Mr. McNall.
                  Agricultural Engineering
   PROFESSOR E. R. JONES; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS
                   DTJFFEE, SCHAENZER
  The Department of Agricultural Engineering has unusual
facilities for giving practical instruction to students. Thou-
sands of dollars' worth of tractors, engines, machinery, tools
and farm-building equipment are loaned to the department by
manufacturers each year for the use of students in the lecture
room and laboratory.
Attention is called to the special grouping of courses on
page 22 to permit intensive training in agricultural en-
gineering. Special students registered in advance by the de-
partment may enter as regular Short Course students but take
all their work in Agricultural Engineering or allied subjects.
For information write to the Agricultural Engineering depart-
ment.
A. Gas Engines. Demonstrational lectures supplemented by
laboratory work. Adjustments and operation of gas engines.
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