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Dicke, Robert J. (ed.) / Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters
volume XLIV (1955)

McCabe, Robert A.
The prehistoric engineer-farmers of Chihuahua,   pp. 75-90 PDF (6.1 MB)


Page 84

The "fort" wall, part of which is shown here, was 280 feet long
and seven
feet at its greatest height. Note the porous nature of the volcanic rock.
 84 Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters [Vol. 44 
 Despite my calling this site a fort, it was probably not used as such. The
wall did not stand above the ground level, but appeared as a stone facing
for the tOp edge of a steep-sided mesa. There was no protection from the
mesa side, which would have been most vulnerable to attack. These facts preclude
any protection from this mortarless masonry. What then was this structure?
My guess is that it was built by a family who took pride in their building
craft, and who used their skill to protect the mesa rim 
on which the dwelling perched. The building was probably built on this site
because it was near several meadows and because of its commanding view. Today
water and fuel would be as easy to procure had the dwelling been built a
short distance from the canyon rim where no earth-supporting walls would
be needed. It may have been otherwise in the days of the builder. 
 On another occasion, while attempting to photograph some wild flowers near
our camp site, I climbed a fallen tree in order to get an overhead view of
the blossoms. From a height of about 6 feet I noticed through the reflex
lens of my camera that stones near the flowers were arranged in a crude circle
about 50 feet in diameter, with other rows of stones radiating from the center
to 


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