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Dicke, Robert J. (ed.) / Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters
volume XLIV (1955)

Persidsky, D. J.; Wilde, S. A.
Effect of eradicants on the microbiological properties of nursery soils,   pp. 65-73 ff. PDF (2.7 MB)


Page 70

 70 Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters [Vol. 44 
the most unfavorable influence. A strong depressing effect is also caused
by thiosan and benzene hexachioride. Chiordane proved to be the least inhibiting;
this behaviour may have a bearing upon observations of Voigt (1953) who recorded
a high rate of oxygen uptake by root tips in the presence of chlordane suspensions.
FIGURE 1. Growth of 1—0 P1~u~ ' radiata seedlings in a coarse sandy
soil treated with different biocides at the indicated rate of application:
A— Untreated soil; B—Chlordane, 10 lbs/A; C—Thiosan,
125
lbs/A; D—Allyl alcohol, 50 gal/A; E—Benzene hexachioride
(gamma
isomer), 1.0 lbs/A; F—Calomel, 40 lbs/A. 
 The direct influence of different biocides on the development of fungi was
investigated by observing the growth of Aspergillus niger in a suspension
prepared from 20 g. of soil and 30 ml of nutrient solution (Mehlich, Truog,
and Fred, 1933). Inoculated soils were incubated for 5 days at 350 C. The
weights of mycelia, given in Table 2, indicate that the most unfavorable
influence, reducing the growth of mycelia about 50 per cent, is exerted by
allyl alcohol and calomel. Chlordane proved to be the least toxic. The triplicate
results give rather small deviations from the aver- 


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