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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Annual report of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society for the year ending July 1, 1921
Vol. LI (1921)

Sheldon, Henry T.
[Tomatoes for] Everybody's garden,   pp. 35-39 PDF (1.3 MB)


Page 35


WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY
EVERYBODY'S GARDEN
SEVEN VARIETIES OF TOMATOES FOR EVERYBODY'S GARDEN
AND THE BEST ONE; THREE WAYS OF TRAINING
TOMATOES AND THE BEST WAY.
HENRY T. SHELDON, MADISON
When Mr. Cranefield spoke to me about making this talk, I
should probably have refused if he had suggested any other
subject than tomatoes. I do not feel that I am qualified either
by knowledge or experience to discuss any phase of gardening
before this body, but he assured me that what was wanted was the
experience of the ordinary "dub gardener" rather than the expert,
which made me feel a little easier, and then this subject of tom-
atoes appealed to me at once.
I do not think there is any vegetable raised in the ordinary
garden out of which we can get as much fun and satisfaction as
we can out of the tomato; when you go out to the garden and
gather a fine basket of tomatoes, you really feel that you have
something to show and talk about, and you know that a whole lot
of the satisfaction you get out of your garden is in talking it over
with your neighbor, who also has a garden, and comparing your
crop with his and swelling up a little if your tomatoes are earlier
or bigger or more abundant than the ones in his plot.
Then the tomato is a vegetable with which it is hardly possible
to make a complete failure, it is singularly free from disease or
the attacks of parasites, it will withstand too much moisture or too
much dryness, and even if you neglect it and do not cultivate it, it
will struggle gamely along and produce pretty well even under the
most adverse conditions.
However, they should not be left to fight it out alone for there is
nothing in the garden which will respond to care and cultivation
more willingly; a little thought in selecting the location and a little
care in planting and cultivation and they will work their heads off
for you the whole summer long.
35


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