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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Annual report of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society for the year 1910
Volume XL, Part II (1910)

Hatch, A. L.
The Door County fruit district,   pp. 212-214 PDF (995.3 KB)


Page 213


WINTE MEETING.                   213
great capacity to endure frost if it should occur. Not only is
the bloom thus made hardy but the severest cold to which trees
are subjected is abated in such a way that no injury results.
These conditions are brought about by the influence of the lake
and bay water upon the climate. And these influences are per-
manent and reliable-something to be always counted on as a
factor in fruit culture here.
Another asset of this water influence upon the climate is its
effect upon the character and quality of the fruit itself. This is
very markedly shown in the keeping and shipping quality of the
fruit grown here. Never subjected to the long continued and high
temperatures of regions south and inland the fruit of all kinds
has a firmer and better texture usually that adds very much to
its life and capacity to endure shipment without hurt. Of -all
the cherries, for instance, that I have grown here, amounting to
several thousand bushels, I do not remember any loss from fail-
ure to hold up in shipment. Any variety of apple that we grow
will keep much longer than the same variety grown elsewhere
in Wisconsin. Not only can we end the market with Duchess
and Wealthy when others have done, but we can furnish such
sorts as Snow apples in fine condition well into winter. And
still more we have some kinds that will keep till spring as sound
as desired. These facts point to a fine field of profitable apple
culture that is now beginning to attract some attention.
The soils of Door county peninsula are founded upon Niagara
limestone. Both in the pine and hardwood region it is a very
valuable factor for fruit growing. When properly selected es-
pecially with reference to depth above the bed rock, subsoil and
exposure, it ranks well with that of any other region. Here
clover and all grasses thrive finely, assuring the conditions to
secure desired humus and soil enrichment.
The first commercial planting of the cherry was made in
1896-8 by myself and the late Prof. E. S. Goff of Madison, Wis.
In the latter year I induced Mr. A. W. Lawrence to plant five acres
and from the success of these and other orchards the possibility of
very profitable cherry growing has been fully demonstrated.
Ever since the trees were large enough to bear they have borne
paying crops, the combined crop of last season amounting to
over seven thousand crates or about 13 carloads.  For a series
of five or six years the average net returns would capitalize the
land at over $3,000 per acre. There is promise of some younger
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