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Wisconsin State Agricultural Society / Transactions of the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, including the proceedings of the state agricultural convention held in February, 1885, together with other practical papers
Vol. XXIII (1885)

Barry, A. C.
The agricultural outlook,   pp. 229-273


Page 266

WISCONSIN STATE ACRICULTURAL 'SOCIETY. 
woman. I believe that the elasses of edueation are common 
to us -all, and the fun damental prineiples of edueation are 
the same, and our s*tate institutions shotild be of such a char- 
aeter that the -instruction there given i ' s equal to any that 
ean be given in any- institution in this country, a:id if it is as 
good as' any that can be given it is none too good for - the 
farmer. 
Our agricultural institution should be made the best there 
is in the country, and not left to one professlorship of chem- 
istry and a superintendent of the farm. We should have a 
corps of professors in that in'stitution teaching veterinary 
surgery, animal anatomy' and *hysiology, the various 
Classes of - inseets and everything that pertains to'the farm. 
th6 best talent that can be obtained in the United States. 
And.when you add, to that college professorships'of the 
highest possible intelligence and the highest possible scien- 
tifie ability, to teachIhe people.,ýthe' farmers and every man 
interested in agriculture, the. principles of 'agriculture, you 
will give your college a character and a'reputation that is 
. not found in any other a.gricultural college in the United 
-States, and it will be an honor to your state. The farmer 
does not on his farm know simply hov to hoe and plow, he 
needs to be, a mechanie, as well asa' sower of seed. A large 
proportion of our ao-ricultural work is mechanical. We 
want, connected with our ao*ricultural college, the best 
possible advantages for teaching mechanism. We have 
begun right here in Madison. We have started a seientifie 
hall, where we have a, good machine shop, where the princi- 
ples of mechanism dan betaught as perfectly as any where 
else in the world. G Ontlernen of the', legislature, you want 
to add to that departrnent, you want . to have the faeilities 
not only to work iron but to work wood, to make shoes, to 
make cloaks, to make dresses, to teae-h the ladies how they 
ean make their own äpparel-, teach every department of 
mechanics as well as farming. 
Mr. Fish - When this ý bill was being framed, this one 
clause took a great deal of our t-hought. It was at first 
made to read that the majority should be practieal farmers. 
It was af terwards thought best by sorne that it should be 


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