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Rahmlow, H. J. (ed.) / Wisconsin horticulture
Vol. XXX (September 1939/July-August 1940)

Wisconsin horticulture, vol. 30, no. 9: May, 1940,   pp. [241]-272


Page 271

 
WISCONSIN  HORTICULTURE 
GARDEN NOTES 
INFORMATION ABOUT BIRDS 
B IRD lovers will be interested 
   to know that they may ob- 
tain from the Wisconsin Conser- 
vation Department, State Capi- 
tol, Madison, a bulletin entitled 
"Wisconsin Birds, Sources of In- 
formation." The bulletin is very 
complete, giving the names of 
birds in Wisconsin, and then a 
large list of sources of material 
on the subject of birds useful in 
studying the subject. Books, pam- 
phlets, motion pictures and lan- 
tern slides on birds are listed. 
The bulletin is free. 
  SCRAP BOOKS FOR THE 
      GARDEN CENTER 
T HE Menasha Garden Club has 
   an excellent plan for provid- 
ing information for their Garden 
Center, located in the City Li- 
brary. 
  Members of the club have been 
appointed on a "scrap book com- 
mittee," each member to make a 
scrap book on some phase of gar- 
dening. Pictures and articles from 
magazines are clipped and pasted 
in the scrap book so that when 
the book is complete, it is an un- 
usually good source of informa- 
tion on the topic. Such topics as 
landscaping, flower arrangement, 
table setting, dirt gardening, and 
certain flowers such as peonies, 
iris, phlox, etc., are excellent ti- 
tles for scrap books. 
THIN OUT DELPHINIUM 
           CLUMPS 
O   LD Delphinium clumps may 
     send up a dozen or more 
shoots. These should be thinned 
to four or at most five of the 
strongest shoots as soon as the 
new growth is about three or 
four inches high. 
  The result will be much strong- 
er and better flower spikes and 
larger and more beautiful flow- 
ers. 
    295 AMERICAN BIRDS 
RECENTLY       we asked Prof. 
    Aldo Leopold, professor of 
Wild Life Management at the 
University of Wisconsin, for a list 
of illustrated books on birds. He 
recommended very highly a book 
entitled 295 American Birds by 
Dr. T. S. Roberts. It is a book of 
pictures of 295 l)irds. The illus- 
trations are very accurate and it 
should be an excellent book for 
the amateur, as well as profes- 
sional, to aid in the identification 
and study of birds. It contains an 
index of both scientific and popu- 
lar nanmes of each bird. No text, 
however. 
  We have made arrangements 
to take orders for this book. Send 
check or money order for $2.00 to 
the Wisconsin Horticultural So- 
ciety, 424 University Farm Place, 
Madison, Wisconsin, and the book 
will be sent by mail, prepaid. 
  The color plates in this volume, 
which is in a spiral binding are 
the same color plates as in the 
book, Birds of Minnesota, which 
sells in 2 Volumes at $25.00. 
     DO NOT LIME IRIS 
O NE word of caution-do not 
     spread lime over Iris beds 
in the spring as is so often sug- 
gested! It has been the experi- 
ence of most Iris growers that 
liming the surface of the soil is 
definitely conducive to Iris root 
rot, and should, therefore, be 
avoided as if it were poison. 
-F. W. Cassebeer, Editor of 
American Iris Society Bulletin, 
in The Flower Grower. 
  A 1,king face gets a short re- 
ception. 
      LABELING ROSES 
M ISS MIRIAM TOWNSEND 
     of Melrose, Mass., has a 
unique, inexpensive and perma- 
nent way to identify the roses in 
her garden. She has a circular 
rose garden of 150 hybrid tea 
roses with an entrance at one 
point in the circumference s5 
that the bed may be viewed from 
both sides. 
  She has a piece of cardboard 
about 15 inches square upon 
which she has put 150 gummed 
labels in exactly the same posi- 
tion as the 150 roses in her gar- 
den. The labels are elliptical in 
form and about one inch the long 
way. On these labels are the 
names of her roses. If one is re- 
placed or changed the change is 
shown onl the cardboard by put- 
ting a new label over the o0l one. 
The labels always correspond to 
the roses in the garden. In this 
way any rose can be identified 
from the cardboard diagram and 
the labels whether the rose is in 
bloom or not. The cardboard is 
kept in the house or conservatory 
so that it is not affected by the 
weather. The same method can 
be employed for plants in any 
garden and is simple and very 
satisfactory. 
  By George A. Sweetser, Massa- 
chusetts, in Horticulture. 
  A SUMMER SCHOOL FOR 
      GARDEN LOVERS 
   By Annette Hoyt Flanders 
In Milwaukee-University Club. 
Tuesday Mornings at 10:30 A.M. 
  on May 28, June 4, 11, 18, 25, 
          and July 2 
  Information and registration 
blanks may be obtained from 
Miss Phyllis Miller, 1119 No. 
Marshall St., Milwaukee. 
  Here is an excellent course for 
the garden lover. 
May, 1940 
271 


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