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The Wisconsin Blue Book, 1923
(1923)

Miscellaneous: census statistics, Wisconsin newspapers, Wisconsin post offices,   pp. [641]-674 PDF (10.7 MB)


Page 674


674                   WISCONSIN BLUE BOOK
          STATE CONSERVATION COMMISSION
          Name                   Residence        From         To
James Nevin .........................  M adison ..................  1915
 1921
W. E. Barber ........................  La  Crosse.................  1915
 1923
F B. Moody .........................  Rhinelander...............  1915  1918
C. L. Harrington .....................  Hurley ....................  1918
 1923
B. 0. W ebster .......................  Delafield..................  1921
 1927
Elmer S. Hall........................* Green Bay................  1923  1929
R. S. Scheibel, Sec....................  M adison ..................  1915
 ................
  The State Conservation Commission as it now exists was created
in 1923 with Elmer S. Hall appointed as the Commissioner. It consisted
of a consolidation of the departments of state game warden, the
-forestry board, the park board and the commissioners of fisheries.
  The first appropriation made by the State of Wisconsin in the work
of fish culture was under Chapter 211, laws of 1873. The Legislature
at that time made an appropriation of $500 to be expended under the
direction of Spencer F. Baird, U. S. Commissioner of Fisheries.
  The Commissioner of Fisheries was created under Chapter 253, laws
of 1874. The first fish artificially propagated in the State of Wisconsin
consisted of 100,000 salmon eggs which were shipped from San Fran-
cisco to Boscobel, Wis. They were propagated in a private hatchery
owned by a Mr. Palmer at that point. The eggs produced approxi-
mately 60,000 fry. These fish were distributed in the waters of Grant,
Crawford and Lafayette Counties, some in the Four Lakes at Madison
and several thousand in Lake Geneva. The first state hatchery was
established at Madison.
  The original law as to wardens was created under Chapter 455, laws
of 1885. The state now operates twelve hatcheries. In the biennium
ending 1922 twelve different varieties of game fishes common to the
Wisconsin waters were planted and in round numbers totalled approxi-
mately 250,000,000 fry. During the state's fiscal year ending June 30,
19,2, the total income collected by the department amounted to
$387,557.22.
  In 1921, 137 forest and field fires were reported as having burned
over 38,044 acres of land. Seventy-five fires or 51 per cent were
reported with itemized or estimated losses amounting to $36,412.00.
  The reports of the fur industry show a total value of $914,617.55.
The greatest item consisted of muskrat skins of which 340,615 were
reported as caught and sold for $490,616.10. In addition thereto 5,629
beaver were trapped in the State of Wisconsin in twelve of the
northern counties. These beaver skins were sold for $94,978.15.
  During the deer season of 1921, 4,289 bucks were killed and in 1922,
2,869.


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