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Wisconsin Cheese Makers' Association / Proceedings of the Wisconsin Cheese Makers' Association forty-second annual convention November 15, 16, 1933 assembled in the Eagles Auditorium Sheboygan, Wisconsin
(1934)

Broughton, C. E.
The recovery act and its application to the cheese manufacturers,   pp. 57-62 PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 62


62     WISCONSIN CHEESE MAKERS' ASSOCIATION
stay in Sheboygan to make it pleasant-I know that we have lots of
entertainment here, I know too that it wasn't fair for the gentleman
leading the singing this afternoon, to ask the ladies to first sing that
sweetheart song because the men should have made the proposal and
not the women. I know that there isn't a salt concern in the United
States that wouldn't make that proposal to the women, and I have
been to your conventions here and in Milwaukee and in Beaver Dam,
that is, some of them were just sectional, but you know these sec-
tional conventions sometimes take on a lot of life after the business
sessions are over. I want you here in Sheboygan to enjoy everything
that we have. We pride ourselves in our beer. If you don't like it,
give me a ring and I will tell them to put out a new brew. May be a
little green but we will get some that is fairly seasoned, if we try.
If there is anything else I can do for you while you are here, I am
at your pleasure and again, I want to say that I am happy that you
have come, and I hope you will come back and as I stood with Presi-
dent Roosevelt Monday afternoon in his study and talked with him,
I mentioned that I was going to or had to get back home in order that
I might appear here this afternoon, and he said, will you take back a
personal message from me, that the President of the United States is
laboring in the interests of the people, that he is thinking in terms of
Wisconsin, and all he asks is that you be lenient and think with him
and act with him, for only by united effort can any cause so big, so
worth-while be won.
I think, my friends, perhaps I have said this before, but there are
many here this afternoon that have not been at the sectional meet-
ings that I have addressed. I consider and feel and I have always
said that I believe in our president, and now we are disregarding and
forgetting party, because in this great conflict over the NRA there
can be no party. Republicans, Democrats and Socialists have all got
to act, all got to be of one great faith, and that faith has got to be
uppermost in their country, and so I have said that our president, I
believe, is a man of destiny. In every great crisis that has con-
fronted this country from the day of Washington, through Lincoln's
time, there is somewhere in some perhaps far distant place, where in
a great crisis and in trying times a leader has come forth. I feel
that it was ordained that our president should take the oath of office.
I recall well his appearance in Chicago and I recall well his leaving on
that trip previous to the fourth of March and coming back through
Florida the attempt to assassinate him. It is unfortunate that an-
other, the mayor of a great city, had to be offered as a sacrifice, but
it goes to prove my friends, that it was ordained that that man should
sit in the Executive Chair and there act for the great rank and file,
the people, the common people, the plain people. In the final analy-
sis, the Flower of America. I thank you.
THE PRESIENT: I certainly want to thank Mr. Broughton for the
fine address he gave us here this afternoon.
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