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Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association / Proceedings of the tenth annual meeting of the Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association held at Monroe, Wisconsin, Thurs. and Fri., January 27 and 28, 1910
(1910)

Williman, Joe
Packing and marketing cheese,   pp. 70-74 PDF (881.7 KB)


Page 71


SOUTHERN WIS. CHEESEMAKERS' & DAIRYMEN'S ASS'N. 71
It is necessary that we consider the copperage on
account of the excessive freight we are paying. Boxes
ranging from 1f to 24 pounds are a factor which mean
dollars and cents, for example a carload of cheese of 250
boxes means a difference of S60.00 in freight by using the
heavier boxes, besides a box neatly trimmed will be a
potnl(l lightcr and each tub from 4 to 6 pounds. The lumber
mills dress all lumber for the market to save freight
although it costs them cash money, but there is a saving.
You pay your cheesemakers for good work, therefore it will
not cost you any more if you insist on well made and
trimmed boxes and tubs. The american cheese producers
have us beaten, for they market as high as 04 pounds of
cheese in a 5 to 6l pound box.
The dealers in Switzerland send their cheese all over
to America in a package that weighs just one half as
much as ours, and it is in better condition than many of
the tubs and boxes when they leave the farmers wagon at
our warehouses in this city.  It being the workmanship
that makes the difference. Fellow dairy men, the Wiscon-
sin Dairy School has proven to us that we lose thousands
of dollars a year, because we do not control temperature in
making and curing cheese, and I prove that you lose
hundreds of dollars by excessive freight paid on unproper
boxing and tubbing, and if the cheese dealers among us
feel like telling the truth, they must say that the pack-
ing and boxing are too often in a deplorable condition, and
as the factories are better equipped and the trade demands
neatness, we must produce a neat clean package.
My fellow country men, has it not appeared to you
low nicely everything is put up now days to attract your
eye and to give you a good opinion of the article therein and
have you ever noticed a freight depot platform, when it was
covered with merchandise ready for shipment and compared
the workmanship as well as the lumber used in the different
packages. I am sure that if you did you have noticed the
remarkable difference in appearance. I have often seen it in


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