University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Wisconsin. State Conservation Committee (1915-27) / Biennial report of the State Conservation Commission of Wisconsin for the years 1915 and 1916
(1916)

Appendix to report of forestry division. Forest fire plan,   pp. [121]-138 PDF (3.3 MB)


Page 132


132        WISCONSIN     CONSERVATION      COMMISSION
by an inspector, which the commission was authorized by law to employ.
The law now provides that all locomotives on main lines must be equipped
with efficient spark arresters, and tnat locomotives on branch lines or
spurs in the protected region must have screens over the smoke stacks,
so as to prevent the escape of sparks. These measures have resulted in
a very material reduction in the number of fires which annually were
attributed to this cause.
Record of fires.
  Each ranger is required to keep a record of all fires which occur within
his district. The date of each fire, location, area burned over, when and
by
whom reported, and all other points of information bearing upon the fire
are recorded.
                        DETECTION.
Lookout towers.
  Four main and four auxiliary lookout towers are maintained within
the protective area as follows:
                                                        Approximate
                                                HeiMht Area of View.
1. Muscalunge Lake Tower ........................................ 55 t. 
100 sq. mi.
2. Tomahawk................................................................
55 ft.  144 sq. mi.
3. Rest Lake Tower ............................ ............ 55 ft.  64 sq.
mi.
4. Oxley Lake Tower .......................................   55 ft.  64
sq. mi.
A4 xiliary towers                                       Approximate
                                                Height Area of view
1. Camp No. 2 Lookout .......................................   40  36 sq.
mi.
2. Tower in 41-3 .......................................  20  36 sq. mi.
3. Tower in 40-3 .......................................  20  36 sq. mi.
4. Tower in 40-14 ........    ................................  20  36 sq.
mi.
  The five towers first named are of steel construction, each 55 feet high
and each set upon prominent hills so that they command a complete
view of the surrounding country; the auxiliary towers are tall poles also
set on prominent hills. Into each auxiliary tower iron steps have been
screwed, which permits of easy climbing, and thus a patrolman can obtain
a good view of the surrounding country. These towers are of primary
importance in the detection of forest fires.
  Each tower is equipped with:
    1. A mounted and oriented field map, with protractor.
    2. One alidade.
    3. One pair of field glasses.
    4. One wall telephone instrument.
    5. One portable telephone.
    6. One shovel and canvas pail.
    7. One set of telephone repair tools.
  The field glasses enable the observer to obtain a clearer view of the sur-
rounding country. Should a fire be discovered, the observer immediately


Go up to Top of Page