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The papoose
Vol. I. No. 2. (January, 1903)

Basket weaving,   pp. 13-16


Page 16

schools, and recognized as their own characteristic work,
the training of their fathers from remote ancestry, the joy
of the industrious and the reward of the faithful.
Mr. Grinnell says : " To give the Indian something to
do by which he can earn money and in which he will be
interested, either for the work itself or for the reward
which it will bring is at present the very best thing and the
most practical that we can do for him.
"Indian basketry schools, training departments fully
equipped and well and faithfully managed with suitable
protection and remuneration furnish a means that is avail-
able to almost every tribe on the continent. May the time
soon come when they are established."
H. N. Rust of Pasadena, formerly an Indian agent,
said " I have for a long time entertained such a plan myself
and cannot but give this word of addition to the proposed
plan; that the scheme shall include all forms of Indian
work, such as blanket weaving, pottery and other forms of
handiwork.
" The Navajo blanket weavers are among the most
skilful in the world; their work is unique, interesting and
cannot be imitated. They weave into every piece some-
thing of their own life, some trait from life, some sign of
wood, forest and hill, something that tells of their life with
the rattlesnake and the quail, of their hunt for the puma
and wild chase after the deer and the antelope. They are
an industrious people and would profit by any protection
of their labors that could be given to them.
"Steady employment should be given to them, yet not
such as would make them feel that they must labor from
sun-up to sun-down, without stopping; they should be given
a certain amount to do, in a certain number of days or
weeks, and let them take their own appointed time for
completing the work; doing much at one time and less or
nothing at all when they feel like it; in so doing they are
living out the plan of their ancestry.
"They might also have their work arranged in a sort
of communistic plan so that all shall receive a share of the
whole, and in so doing each will feel that he is contributing
to the commonwealth, and will have an interest in securing
the best and most continuous application of energy from all
the balance."-Brooklyn (N. Y.) Eagle.


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