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McLeod, Donald / History of Wiskonsan, from its first discovery to the present period, including a geological and topographical description of the territory with a correct catalogue of all its plants
(1846)

Chapter XII,   pp. 214-231 PDF (3.0 MB)


Page 220


HISTORY OF WISKONSAN.
du Chien, and six miles from the Mississippi, a copper
mine has been discovered, the ore of which will yield
about 62 per cent, being about 7 per cent better than
that found at Mineral Point. Another copper mine
has been discovered, which is very rich and exten-
sive, on the Kickapoo. Iron ore of a superior quality
has been found on Black river, which empties into the
Mississippi about sixty miles below the Chappewa river.
On the Bareboo also, which empties into the Wiskon-
san some fifty miles above the Kickapoo, within the
past year have been made many discoveries giving
unmistaken indications of a valuable copper region.
On the Mississippi, at Prairie la Cross, some hundred
miles above Prairie du Chien, indications of copper to
some extent have been found, although the grounds
have not been examined to any extent. On the upper
waters of the St. Croix river some rich discoveries
have also been made. The ore in that region is of
great richness. Along the Wolf river, also, which is
tributary to the Fox, some fifty miles above Green Bay,
splendid discoveries are represented to have been made.
The cave at Dubuque, discovered some time since, is
estimated to contain 3.000.000 pounds of lead. From
those sources of mineral weaith with which' we are
already acquainted, and from the presumption that
other discoveries may be made, Wiskonsan may be
considered the richest mineral country in the world.
If the mineral lands could be purchased without incum-
brance from government, it is believed that the mining
business would progress with greater rapidity than at
present. A speedier communication with the east is
of essential importance to the mining districts; in other
220


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