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McLeod, Donald / History of Wiskonsan, from its first discovery to the present period, including a geological and topographical description of the territory with a correct catalogue of all its plants
(1846)

Chapter XII,   pp. 214-231 PDF (3.0 MB)


Page 219


219
HISTORY OF WI5KONSAN.
the state of Michigan has had the territory explored
by the state Geologist, Dr. Houghton.
  Of the abundance of copper and lead. Doctor H. has
the fullest confidence. In opening a vein, with a sin-
gle blast, he threw out nearly two tons of copper ore,
and with it were numerous masses of pure copper,
from the most minute speck to pieces of forty pounds
in weight. Of the ores examined, their purity proved
to be from 51 per cent down to 21. The great mines
in Cornwall, in England, have not produced over 12
per cent, since 1771, and since 1822, have not aver-
aged over 8 per cent. The ore worked in Wiskonsan,
averages about 25 per cent. There is a copper rock
on the Antonagon river, estimated to weigh between
three and four tons. A piece of it, chiseled off by
Doctor H., and analyzed, contained 68 per cent of
pure metal. While at Detroit, a friend showed us a
piece which he cut from the mass, weighing four
pounds, and such was its toughness, that he broke
twenty-two chisels in obtaining it. The lead trade of
Wiskonsan and Galena is already a busiress of a mil-
lion dollars a year: that ot copper will equal, if not
exceed it.
  The lead region occupies sixty townships, of six
miles square: the unexplored district north of the
Wiskonsan river, not included in what is now called
the mineral district, contains lead mines of great value.
The copper region begins on the southern shore of
Lake Superior, and extends in a southwesterly direc-
tion, to the Mississippi river, or to the present lead
region. Copper has also been found in the country
above the Kickapoo river. Twelve miles from Prairie
A


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