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The history of Columbia County, Wisconsin, containing an account of its settlement, growth, development and resources; an extensive and minute sketch of its cities, towns and villages--their improvements, industries, manufactories, churches, schools and societies; its war record, biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and early settlers; the whole preceded by a history of Wisconsin, statistics of the state, and an abstract of its laws and constitution and of the constitution of the United States
(1880)

Chapter XIII,   pp. 747-795 PDF (25.2 MB)


Page 792


HISTORY OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
     Since the above was put in type the spring has been opened to its fountain
head, and the
 following analysis made:
      Potassium sulphate........... ................................................0.0234
      Sodium chloride..     ......................... ..................................0.1983
      Sodium sulphate ................. .... ........... .............................................................
 0.6007
      Sodium bicarbonate............................................................
0.5338
      Sodium phosphate ...................................... ...................................
........................  trace.
      Calcium bicarbonate...........               .................................................
15.0757
      Magnesium bicarbonate........................................................8.4447
      Iron bicarbonate ...................... ...............................................................
 0.6059
      Aluminum oxide........................................... ................
.....0.0699
      Silica (silicon  dioxide)....................................................................
 0.3091
            Total grains of solids in a gallon (231 cubic inches)....................
.......... 25.8615
     Perils of the Iee.-Under date of December 2, 1876, the Columbus Democrat
relates the
following:   "At noon on Friday of last week, the children at the district
school, three miles
north of the village of Lodi, while at play, went upon the newly formed ice
upon the pond near
the school premises. The ice gave way, and five of them-fell into water seven
feet deep, beneath
which was a bottom of mud. The cry of alarm was raised, and fell upon the
ears of Mr. John
McCarton, the teacher, who proved to be a noble young man, as our correspondent
declares him.
He sprang to the rescue, pulled off his coat and leaped in. 'He was the fortunate
instrument
of saving two lives, one of the recovered being a little daughter of James
Wilson, and the other
a child of James Collins. The other three children clung so close to him
in their wild afright
that he was drawn under the water himself. Indeed, his own chance of escape
was now very
small, for he had become so nearly lifeless that he could not cling with
his hands to the rope,
which had, by this time, been cast to him, they had become so chilled; but
by seizing the rope
with his teeth, his grasp was at length so tenacious that he was finally
pulled out by that
means. He was at once taken to the house of James Wilson, where he received
every care, and
has since recovered.   Three children were drowned.      One of them   was
a daughter of Mr.
Dennis Maloney, and her age was thirteen.     The other two were children
of Mr. C. Flint, a
a boy, aged eleven, and a daughter, aged fourteen.   It is related that the
brother got out once,
and would have made good his escape but for his endeavors to rescue his sister.
In so doing,
he was pulled in again, and thus lost his own life in an unsuccessful attempt
to save hers. The
bodies of the drowned were dragged from     the water on Friday evening,
and taken to their
homes for the last time.   The funeral of Mr. Flint's son and daughter occurred
at the Baptist
Church, in Lodi, tho Sunday following, and was very largely attended. The
remains of Mr.
Maloney's daughter were borne to the Catholic Church, at Rocky Run, on the
same day, and
were also followed by a large procession."
                                    VILLAGE     OF OKEE.
                                        BY ARETAS BAILEY.
     The first settler at Okee was Samuel Ring, who came and built the saw-mill
in 1847. The
mill passed through the hands of Z. Kipp, Blachley & Mathers, Blachley
& Bailey, Bailey & Wells
and T. S. Wells. In 1858, T. S. Wells erected the present saw-mill on the
east side of the
creek and -put in a planing-mill and circular saws in addition, devoting
the old mill to a mill
for grinding feed. In 1869, Wells sold the mill power to John Brownrigg,
the present owner,
who erected the present commodious grist-mill in 1875.  Seth Bailey settled
in Okee in 1854, be-
coming joint owner in the saw-mill with Dr. Miller Blachley, and platted
the village of Okee in
1858.   Mrs. T. S. Wells built the first house after the village was platted.
 James R. Wells and
Rebecca Harmon were the first wedded couple; and a little child of this couple
was the first to
die. The first school taught was in the year 1849, by Miss Eunice Kirk, in
a room of Reuben
Ring's house, who received for the three months' service the sum of $6.
     The first Postmaster appointed was Gideon Clark, April, 1858, E. W.
Horton acting as
Deputy; Gideon Clark not residing in the village. The following year, Isaac
P. (Dole started
792


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