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Broehm, Barbara / World War II through the eyes of Manitowoc's homefront youth
(December 2000)

World War II through the eyes of Manitowoc's homefront youth,   pp. [1]-30


Page 18

Broehm 18 
Radio programs played such an important part in the life of the homefront
children that almost sixty years later they can still recall the exact time
these radio 
programs were aired. Karl recalls that after school he and his brother would
hurry out to 
the barn to feed the animals so they would be back in the house by 5 PM to
listen to Jack 
Armstrong. He states, "The radio was in the living room, and we were
forbidden to eat in 
that room... my brother and I would have the radio blaring so we could listen
to the 
radio program in the kitchen." His goal was to get his dad interested
in Captain 
Midnight. He explains, "If Dad started listening to the show, we knew
we would be able 
to hear the whole show!" He said that sometimes his dad went along with
their scheme, 
but at 6:15 PM sharp his dad would say, "'We have to get going,' and
off to the barn 
we'd go to finish chores.'" 
To keep radio writers abreast of the latest policy decisions, the Office
of War 
Information (OWI) three times each month provided pamphlets explaining governmental
programs. This way writers were equipped with the latest official information
which 
would insure exactness and compatibility with the war effort. The comedy
program 
Fibber McGee and Molly Show often dealt with the political issue of the war.
Throughout the war years its writer, Don Quinn, integrated into the scripts
topical issues 
such as women factory workers, war bond rallies, gas rationing, war sons,
air raid 
wardens and knitting clothes for soldiers. Mac Donald claims that "this
type of relevant 
66 Karl Kappelman, interview by Barbara Broehm. 


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