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Broehm, Barbara / World War II through the eyes of Manitowoc's homefront youth
(December 2000)

World War II through the eyes of Manitowoc's homefront youth,   pp. [1]-30


Page 14

Broehm 14 
"Anchors Aweigh," and the boat slid down the ways and dropped off
into the water with 
a tremendous splash. 46 
"My dad was an employee of the shipyards so the family was allowed to
watch 
the launching from the parking lot across the river."47 "I can
recall," says a twelve-year- 
old homefront boy, "the gigantic splash... the wave from the launching
was so huge that 
we got wet sitting on the opposite bank.,4' Harlan adds, "A mighty cheer
rose from the 
crowd as the submarine hit the water... whistles were blowing throughout
the Yards. It 
was a proud day for Manitowoc.'49 
This event was featured in the May 18, 1942 edition of Life magazine: "Sub
Hits 
water Sideways in Navy's First Major Launching on Great Lakes. "50 "It
wasn't until my 
dad saw the article in Life magazine that he realized the significance of
the event," 
comments Karl. He adds, "People came from a thousand miles away to see
the event, 
and my family lived only seven miles away! After the magazine article my
dad took us to 
the launches. They were always at 12 Noon, and we were always amazed how
far people 
traveled to see the submarines."51 
The launching of the Peto was also shown on newsreels to millions of Americans
across the United States. Without television, newsreels were "our view
of the war," 
noted Betty.52 In black and white, the children saw scenes from air, land
and sea battles. 
46 Nelson, 45-46. 
47 Shirley Schnill, interview by Barbara Broehm, 20 November 2000. 
48 Howard Schmill, interview by Barbara Broehm. 
49 Harlan Demsien, interview by Barbara Broehm. 
SO "Sub Hits Water Sideways in Navy's First Major Launching on Great
Lakes," Life 18 May, 
1942, 21. 
51 Karl Kappelman, interview by Barbara Broehm. 
52 Betty Wilsman, interview by Barbara Broehm, 19 November, 2000. 


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