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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 7,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 4


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
ers during the past month as lower
prices for food grains (wheat) and
dairy products were offset by higher
prices for most other groups, mainly
fruit, truck crops, cotton, and poultry
and eigs. The index remains at 247
percent of its 1910-14 average, and
about 1 percent below June a year
ago. Among the meat animals lower
prices for hogs and sheep were offset
by higher beef cattle, veal calf, and
lamb prices. Wool prices increased to
the highest point since December
1918. Changes in the fruit, dairy, and
poultry groups were about seasonal.
Spring Pin Crop Large and More
Fall Pigs Expected
Wisconsin's spring pig crop this
year is 4 percent larger than the one
produced a year ago, and farmers in-
tend to have 11 percent more sows to
farrow this coming fall than they had
in the fall of 1949. This year's spring
pig crop is the largest one reported
for any peacetime year but it is a
fifth smaller than the record crop of
1943.
Wisconsin's spring pig crop this
year is estimated at 2,266,000 head
from the 346,000 sows which far-
rowed. The number of sows which
farrowed was 7 percent larger than in
the spring of 1949 and the number of
pigs saved increased 4 percent. Both
the number of sows farrowing and the
number of pigs saved were above the
10-year average. Included in the June
pig reports from farmers were their
intentions to breed sows for fall far-
rowing. These intentions as expressed
in the June Pig Survey indicate that
Wisconsin farmers will have 183,000
sows to farrow this fall compared
with 165,000 in the fall of 1949. This
would be the largest number since the
fall of 1943.
Oo'v North Dakota of the Corn
lelt states showed a decrease in the
number of spring pigs saved com-
pared with a year ago. An increase
of 4 percent is reported for the Corn
Belt as a whole, and the number of
Spring and Fall Pig Crops
(000 omitted)
Spring                          Fall                Total No.
Pigs Saved
Sews            Pigs           Sows           Pigs          Spring
Farrowed         Saved         Farrowed        Saved          sad Fall
Wisconsin
10-yr. Av., 1939-48                    329          2,179            175
          1,175          3,354
1949                                   323          2,177            165
         1,097           3,274
1950                                   346          2,246             931
Crn Belt2
10-yr. As., 1939-48-6,569                          41,40S          3,905
        22,812          64,216
1949      -       -                  6,807         44,374          3,817
        25,121          6,495
1950                          .      7,281         46,100          4,1601
United States
10-yr. A,., 1939-48       -          8,883         55,191          5,512
        35,230         90, 425
1949 -9,s4                                         58,426          5,726
        37,262         95,688
1950 -9,518                                        60,079          6,0171
' Estimates based on intentions of farmers as reported in the June Pig Survey
and subject to revision.
2Ohio, Indians, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri,
North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska
and Kansas.
sows intended for fall farrowing is
expected to be 9 percent larger than
in the fall of 1949.
For the nation, the spring pig crop
totaled 60,079,000 head, an increase
of 3 percent from last spring. The
number of sows farrowing this spring
was 5 percent larger than a year ago
but the number of pigs saved per lit-
ter averaged 2 percent smaller this
year. With an increase of 5 percent
in the number of sows expected to be
bred for fall farrowing, the nation
may have a crop of about 99,000,000
pigs. This would be a crop 4 percent
larger than in 1949 and 10 percent
above the 10-year average annual
production.
Additional data on the spring and
fall pig crps and intentions of farm-
ers to breed sows for fall farrowing
are shown in the accompanying table.
Stocks of Grains on Farms
(July I estimates)
Thousands of bushels              Percent of previous year's crop
Crop                                           10-yr.                   
            10-yr.
1950         1949       average       1950        1949       averate
1939-48                               1939-48
Wisconsin
Corn, --          -             24,087       16,444      10,975       31.0
       27.0         20.4
Oats                      -     17,983       21,445      18,416       15.0
       17.0         17.8
Wheat-                             605          610         464       24.0
       21.0         27.4
Soybeans                            20           23          402       8.0
       12.0          6.82
United States
Corn,         -- -           1,058,468    1,255,166     686,376       34.0
       36.9         27.5
Oats     .                     190,85       270,501     207,382       14.4
       18.1         16.7
Wheat ------------              64,660       67.172      97.448        5.6
        S.1         10.3
Soybeans          --             6,832        9,505       8,2402       3.1
        4.3          4.32
Data hased on eorn for grain.
2Shlort-time average.
I
UNITEDI) STTATES DE l' A l .AHTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
IlIlUIEAU OF AGlIIC1LUI'Tl_ lAI, ECONOMICS
OF'FIC'IAI, 111 SINESS
IIETUEN AF'rwR FIVT I)YVS TO
AGUICULTURAL STAT1STICi('IAN
11ON 351
MADISON, WIS(ONSIN
Forii, BtAE-A/7/50-43,14:  P'erm it 1001
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PAYMENT OF POSTAGE, $300
LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE LIBRARY,
STATE CAPITOL,
MAPISONj, liS.
NCR
4
(28)
July 1950


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