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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 5,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 4


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER      May 1950
\\age rates was down a little.
Higher average prices were the rule
for most commodity groups sold by
farmers. Important exceptions were
the dairy products and the poultry
and egg groups both of which were
down about seasonally. Most note-
wvorthy changes for individual com-
modities were: soybeans up 23 cents
a bushel, corn 7 cents, and wheat 3
cents. Among the meat animals, beef
cattle were up 80 cents and calves 20
cents per hundredweight. On the
down side, hogs were off 50 cents.
Hay Values Change
During the past year as well as in
1948 there has been a reversal of the
usual pattern of hay values in the
state. According to a recent survey
of Wisconsin dairy reporters, the
average values per ton of hay fed to
milk cows were higher in the north-
ern areas of the state than in the
southern areas. Ordinarily hay prices
side lower in the north.
Drought conditions in the northern
sections of Wisconsin during the last
two growing seasons had cut sharply
into the hay production with a result-
ing rise in hay values in those areas.
The rise was especially pronounced
after the 1948 drought. On Febru-
ary I of both 1949 and 1950, values
of loose hay averaged considerably
higher in the more northerly areas
than farther south. On the first of
February 1947 hay values averaged
highest in the southern third of the
state. Hay is more plentiful and thus
cheaper in the north during normal
seasons and this was the case during
the 1946 growing season.
The district pattern of hay values
is given for both loose and baled hay.
However, the pattern for loose hay
probably gives the truer picture be-
cause the varying baling rates in the
state are not included in the values.
On February 1 this year loose hav
values ranged from $22.82 per ton in
northwestern Wisconsin to $1(i.0() per
ton in the southwestern part. The
spread waS considerably greater Feb-
runry I last year ranging from  an
average of $289.62 per ton in northern
Wisconsin to $21.96 in the south-
eastern district. In both 1950 and
1949 (February 1) values of loose hay
averaged lowest in the southern third
of the state while on the same date in
District
Northwest
North
Northeast
West_.
Central
East.
Soutwe.1
South.
Southeast
S tat  -       .     .         .
1950
Loose
$22.8Z
22.81
22.72
22.31
20.81
19.50
16.30
18.40
19.08
20.74
Baled
$25.86
25.63
24.19
25.67
24.18
23.06
20.05
21.84
23.08
1947 this part of the state reported
the highest average values.
Maple Products Output
Wisconsin producers report more
maple sirup made this year than was
made in 1949, and the crop is above
average. Very little sugar was made
in this state either this year or in
1949, according to the state's pro-
ducers.
Producers report that the season
w as generally good for maple prod-
ucts production in Wisconsin as well
as in the 9 other states for which pro-
duction reports were made. In Wis-
consin more trees were tapped this
year than a year ago, but the total
trees tapped in the other states was
Average value per ton reported
1949
Loose
$28.23
28.62
26.33
25.64
26.85
23 .43
23.43
23.40
21.96
25.84
Baled
$34.13
33.17
31.29
36.08
30. G
La . az
28.63
24.68
24. 77
29.06
1947
Los..
$19.83
22.43
22.26
17.51
20.18
20.18
22.44
22.14
23.53
20.97
Baled
$23.50
30.46
29..56
24.33
28.92
26.60
29.00
30.81
27.89
28.95
smaller than in 1949. All producing
areas reported the sirup averaged
light in color and high in quality.
Maple sirup production in Wiscon-
sill this year is estimated at 76,000
gallons compared with only 59,000
gallons made last year. The 10-year
1939-48 average production is 62,000
gallons.
Nearly 2 million gallons of maple
sirup were produced in the United
States this year, which is about a
fifth more than the quantity made
last year. The output of sugar was
278,000 pounds or about 5 percent
below the 1949 crop. A higher pro-
duction in sugar equivalent over 1949
was made although fewer trees were
tapped this year.
Mlaple Sugar and Sirup Production by States
State
Maine
New Hompshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
New York-
Pennsylvania
Ohio
Michigan
Wisconsin
Maryland
tD States
1950
90
210
3, 127
151
2, 460
348
491
515
291
30
7.713
rrees topped
1.000 tees)
1949
90
219
3,191
154
2,563
345
511
542
277
321P
7,924
Average
1939-48
1954
Its
234
3.666
184
2,832
392
725
509
286
36
8,983
Sugar made I
(1,000 pounds)
1949
4
12
158
9
49
26
8
0
7
278
3
195
28
21
0
1 6
0
7
292
Average
1939-48
6
18
218
21
96
29
12
10
413
Sirup made
(1000 nilon-)
1950_  1949
18
51
47
632
95
134
115
76
16
I1,946
1 .946
12
_ 41
40
538
94
ISO
II0
1101
59
1.61
1)D(s cwt niclude produltion on nonfariii lads in SomeCrset (County, Maine.
t NI'E)D STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE           PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE
TO AVOID
IBIRE AU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS                   PAYMENT OF POSTAGE,
5200
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
RETURN AFWItER FIVE DAYS TO
ASGRICULTURAL STATISTICIAN
BOX 35C1
MADISON, WISCONSIN
WI .CO SI': F'ti^E LIT3..22Y COL: ISIIo:I
STATE CAPITOL
L:ADISOA, ISIS.
I&CR
4
(20)
Real or Estimated Values of Hay Feed
(February 1)
Average 1
1939-48     #
19
51
...
1t
50
660
104
196
109
62
16
2 095
2,095
-
- -
-
-
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.
,
I--     ---v  4  _
I


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