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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 2,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 4


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
February 1950
Farmers of Wisconsin and also the
nation indicate that they intend to
buy 12 percent fewer baby chicks in
1950 than they bought in 1949.
Wisconsin Farm Prices
A decline of nearly 2 percent in
the index of prices received by Wis-
consin farmers occurred from mid-
December to mid-January. The Jan-
uary index was 242 percent of the
1910-1914 average. Farm prices for
1950 started out approximately 10'/2
percent below the level of farm prices
in January 1949). This was the second
successive January to show a de-
cline in farm prices, although the
drop this year was smaller than the
one last year.
The most pronounced change of
Wisconsin prices from the past De-
cember to January was for poultry
and eggs which declined nearly 18
percent between t h e two months.
Poultry and egg prices averaged a
third less this January compared with
January 1949. The January 15 aver-
age price reported received by pro-
ducers for eggs was 27.2 cents per
dozen this year compared with 48.1
cents per dozen on January 15, 1949.
Price changes for other farm prod-
ucts were small from mid-December
to mid-January, although most com-
inodities were considerably lower in
price than in January 1949. The in-
dex of prices paid by Wisconsin farm-
ers for family living and farm pro-
duction expenses was 250 percent of
the 1910-14 average. This represents
a decline of nearly 5 percent from the
January 1949 level in comparison
with a decline of over 10 percent in
prices received by farmers. These dif-
fering price changes resulted in about
a 6 percent decline in the purchas-
ing power of the farm dollar. While
this trend is still downward, the rate
of decline was not as sharp as a year
ago.
United States Farm Prices
Nationally the index of prices re-
ceived by farmers rose from 233 per-
cent of the 1910-14 average in De-
cember 1949 to 235 percent on Janu-
;-ry 15, 1950, according to the new
revised procedure for computing this
index. The increase results mainly
from higher prices farmers received
for truck crops and meat animals
which more than offset lower prices
for poultry, eggs, and dairy products.
Meat animals advanced about 2 per-
cent in price during this period.
Fall Plowing
Less fall plowing was accomplished
for 1950 crops than for 1949 crops
according to a recent survey of Wis-
consin crop reporters. Before the on-
set of winter, 63 percent of the plow-
ing for planting this spring was com-
pleted. Last year 66 percent of the
land had been fall plowed for spring
planting. Only 59 percent was re-
ported for the 1948 crop season while
69 percent was recorded for 1947.
The percentage of fall plowing for
Percent of Plowing Done in Falil'
District
Northwest--
North --             --
Northeast
West --      ----------
Central ---      -----
East               --
Southwest -
South              - -
Southeast
State  --  - -- -
Plowed Fall
of 1949 for
1958 Crops
Percent
74
83
76
69
55
91
24
48
61
63
Plowed Fall
of 1948 for
1949 Crops
Percent
72
83
80~
75
51
93
37
48
68
66
'As reported by Wisconsin crop'corrPqpondcntS, Janu-
ary 1950.
the 1950 crop season was largest in
the eastern counties where it aver-
aged 91 percent. The harvesting of
much of the corn crop for silage in
that area enables the farmers to start
fall plowing earlier in many cases.
A large share of the plowing was
also done in the fall in the northern
third of the state. Fall plowing was
less extensive in the Central and
Southern Districts and considerably
less in the southwestern counties. In
the hilly southwestern area only 24
percent of the fall plowing was com-
pleted.
Where Wisconsin Farmers Buy
Grain and Concentrate Feeds
Close to one-half of the grain and
concentrate feed bought in 1949 by
Wisconsin farmers was purchased
from mills or elevators according to
a recent survey of crop reporters.
Percent of Grain and Concentrate
Feed Bought from Various Sources'
Sources        1949   1948
Percent  Percent
Elevators or Mills -47        45
Feed Stores -29               31
Farm Supply Stores -20        20
Hatcheries -- --   -    I      I
Other -3                       3
Total-100                     100
IAs reported by Wisonsin crop correspondents, Janu-
ary 1950.
Nearly three-tenths of the feed sales
were from feed stores and one-fifth
were from farm supply stores. In
comparison with 1948, mill or ele-
vator sales were up somewhat while
feed store sales dropped a little.
There is considerable fluctuation
within the state in the importance
of the various types of feed suppliers.
Feed stores outlets are the most im-
portant source of feed in northwest-
ern, northern, and southwestern Wis-
consin. In these same areas mills or
elevators are less important than in
other parts of the state. Farm supply
stores sell a larger percentage of the
feed in southwestern Wisconsin than
in other sections.
UNI'T'ED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
III[ItIEAI! OF AGRICULTURAL. ECONOMICS
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
RETUrHN AFTER FIVE DAYS TO
AGUItCULTURAL STATISTICIAN
IIOX 351
MADISON, WISCONSIN
I  1.air   1  \A1  \A/21, at)-pi91fi2 0   P'orm il   1 &111
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE. $300
t.!CR            £,'.WIS.
(8)
New Publication
For those wishing more de-
tailed Informatlons on the istate's
great dairy Industry than Is pre-
sented In this publicaltlon, thin
office publishes "VWIseonsin Dairy-
lng". This in also a monthly pub-
liention whlch gives In some de-
tail the current trends iln the
production, prices, and markets
of milk and dairy products. Any-
osse wishing free copies of "-WIs-
-ousin Bairying" may have them
by writing to the Wl isonsin Crop
Reporting Service, Post Office
Blox .9S1, Madison I; Wisconsin.
q
-
lI


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