University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XVI ([covers January 1937/December 1937])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XVI, no. 3,   pp. [17]-20 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [17]


LEGSILATlVE REFERENCE LIBRARY
MADISCN I rPcON';
WISCONSIN                   STATE DOCITMrNT
WIS.V1CO(.. RFT .IBRAWO
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MARKETS
Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
W. D. BORMUTH. Junior Statistician
FRANCIS J. GRAHAM, Junior Statistician
Vol. XVI, No. 3                 State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin       
        March, 1937
Motlllq, graill and cash crop acreage,
and some reduction itl hay will re-
sult from the spriilg crop plantings of
1937 if the intentions recently expressed
by crop   reporters are  carried  out.
Changes in crop acreage are especially
large for the United States this year.
For Wisconsin, some important changes
are also indicated but they are rela-
tively smaller than those for the United
States.
As a lesult of widespread acreage
losses in recent years from drought and
other causes, the acreage of a number
of crops has been somewhat under
normal. This year some rather strli-
ing increases in crop acreage are tak-
ing place throughout the country,
though in view of the shortage which
exists ill some agricultural coitnmoditits
and the reduced production of recent
years it Is believed that the 1937 at-re -
ages will not be excessive.
Unaited Staten Crop Acreages Inereane
Unusually large increases are noted
in the acreages which farmers expect
to plant for a number of crops this
year. Some of the important increases
which are indicated for the country as
a whole are: 31 percent more tarle ,
87 percent more spring wheat, 15 per-
cent more tobacco, 12 percent more soy-
beans, 7 percent more oats, 6 percent
more potatoes, 2 percent more corn and
5 percent more cabbage. Along with
these increases in acreage a decrease of
2 percent is indicated for hay and about
14 percent for onions.
Since some of the ci-ops which are
showing large increases for the Unitetd
States are also important in Wisconsiti.
these acreage changes are of special in-
terest to the state. The large increase-
in baley, tobacco, an(d potatoes, if they
turn out as now Indicated, will be of
Interest to growers of these crops in
this state.
Wisonislts Aereage Chang-es Modleraite
Unlike the rather large acreage
hanges which are Indicated for the
United States, most of the crops In WIs-
--onsin will not change so mueh from
the acreage of last year. Wisconsin
far-mers expect to reduce their hay
somewhat along with reductions In
spring wheat and barley, and rather
moderate increases will occur in most
,,f the other crops.
The small acreage of dry beans in
Wisconsin is expected to double, and a
50 percent increase is indicated for soy-
beans. The   tobacco  acreage is  ex-
pected to increase about 20 percent
from the rather low level which has
prevailed, and after the decline in acre-
age experienced last year in potatoes
an increase of 10 percent is in prospect
for this year. The acreage of oats in
Wisconsin is not expected to change,
and corn is expected to increase about I
percent. The- increase in cabbage is
expected to be near 5 percent and no
change is indicated for onions.
Weather Summary, February, 1937
Temperature
Degrees Fahrenheit
Station
Duluth    .
Escanaba
Minneapolis ---
La Crosse .
Green Bay.
Dubuque-
Madison    -
Milwaukee-
g
.S
_23
I!
1-21
-11
g
40
41
45
43
43
44
43
49
12.A
20.A
13.4
16 I
19 A1
21 .
19.1
24.1
E
z
11 .4
15.4
15.9
19 .2
17.4
22.2
19 .1
22.8
Precipitation
Inches
I
E2
X0
1 .71
3 .8E
0.41
1 ~iC
2 .2
1 A6
I .7:
g
C
A
1.09
1 .49
0.95
1 .03
I .58
1.51
I .83
S .2
E 3.1
-('-'
+1.72
+3.60
-0.09
+2 .02
+1.66
+3.05
-1
;  1.23
Earlier data onl winter grains indi-
cated a sharp increase in acreage of
both winter wheat and r ye plantings
last fall. So far as is known, these
grains have come through th- winter
rather well, and the acreage to be left
for harvest ill the stat- this ylear will
probably be much above last year.
These intentions-to-plant reports do
not necessarily show the absolute acre-
age situation for 1937 because farmers
jall still make changes in their plant-
ing plans. Much will depend upon the
acreage of hay which finally survives
the winter and spring weather. uAIcih
uncertainty now prevails r-egarditlg hall
crops in some counties of the stat-. A
table  showing  the  prospective crop
acreages for 1937 in both Wisconsin
and the United States togetheil with
changes from  last year in(l fromi tt-
5-yeai average is shown he rewith.
WISCONSIN MARCH MILK
PRODUCTION
High feed prices r esilted in contil-
ued cuitailment of feeding and callsed
a smaller seasonal increase than ut slnl
in milk production onl crIop repm t.r'
farms. Milk production mn th st- farms
on March 1 averagf d 226.4 potlids, nr
an increase of almost 2 percent frmt
a year ago. A 3 pl rcenit higb- I pm
duction per cowv in herd th ii 0  y, ii
ago was offset by a l pflrcen ll l-limn
in the  number   of cows per fat rin.
Weather during Fvbrutit:ir this Yat blt
been  much   milder than  the  stvere
weather experienced a year' aIgo.  ir
dairy correspondents rieported that onl
March 1 they were fe-ding 1.54 p i ds
of  graiti  and  conei -itrat,-   p  r I ill;
cow. With the exclption (of l 125 this
is the lowest March 1 figure ii r, --i.
years. During 1Fbruai y 100 pitinds of
milk would buy only 14 poun(ls of :
standard dairy ration, while a year ago
the same amount of milk bought 145
pounds of ration. The percentage of
calves born during Febrmuary -which ire
being raised remains unchanged froln
Wisconsin and United States Planting Intentions for 1937
WISCONSIN                                                       UNITED STATES
Acreage (000 omitted)                 Intentions 1931               Acreage
(000 omitted)                 Intentions 1937
as percent of                                                        as percent
of
Crop                    Harvested        S-year     Indicated           
        5..year    Harvested       5-year      Indicated                
    S-year'
last year     average     for harvest      1936        average      last
year     average     For harvest       936         average
(19361         9832          13                       1928-32        (1936)
     1928-32        19371983
Corn...   -                      2,~~~~      ~~~204  2,069  2,226       
101.0        107.6         92,829      103.419        94,840        102.
          91.7
Oats...   ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ .. ~2      480         2,471        2.480       
100.0         100.4         33  1          0 0 5       35.660       107.48
           .
Barley ---                  -- -               873         730          
 864        99.0         118.4          8,322       12.645        10,901
      131.0          86.2
Spring wheat ---                                80           66         
  68        85.0         103.0         11,212       20,414        20,918
      186.6         102.5
prie-                      ----------             4           7         
   4       100.0          57.1          1,180        2,772         1,306
      110.7          47.1
Potatoe-----------        -     -              245          261         
270        110.2         103.4         3.058         3,327         3,232
      105.7          97.1
Tobacco                                         1 - - - - 3  37.1       
  15.6     120.0          42.0          1,467        1,872         1,962
       114.7           .9
Dry eans                                                                
   6       200.0          85.7         1,562         1,806         1,731
      110.8          95.8
Soybeans(grownalone) -1----8-----                            32         
 177       150.0         553.1          5,635        2,979         6,300
       111.8        211.5
Tame. hay---------------            -        3,768        3,257         3,730
       99.0         114.5         57,055        55.153       55,967     
  98.1          101.5
Cabbage -----             --     --             I5           16.72      
  15.7     104.7          93.9            183.9        149.2         193.5
     105.2        129.7
Onions           -   -    --                     1.2          1.03      
   1.2     100.0         116.5            109.5         84.4          94.1
     85.9         111.5
IN THIS ISSUE
Planting Intentions for 1937
Milk Production
Egg Production
Prices Farmers Receive and
Pay
I .8
c
ZI


Go up to Top of Page