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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XVI ([covers January 1937/December 1937])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XVI, no. 2,   pp. [9]-16 PDF (4.0 MB)


Page 12


12                                          WISCONSIN CROP 'AND LIVESTOCK
REPORTER
Farm and Market Prices for Milk and Dairy Products'
UNITED
PRICES RECEIVED BY CROP REPORTERS-WISCONSIN                           STATES
           WHOLESALE PRICES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS4
Milk prices by uses' kcwt.)  Milk prices bay uses in per                
                             Cheese (lb.)
Year                                                       cant of average
 Evap-
Av.…--orated
all    For    For     By    Mar-    For    For     By    Mar-    But-   Farm
  But-                 Ameri.                 Lim-   milk' Butter Choose
uses  choose butter   con-    ket   cheese butter con-     ket    tar-  
but..  tar-   Milk' Butter' can' Swiss' Bricka     her.          cheese butter
cwt.   (all          dons-   milk                 does.   milk   fat'   
tar'   fats                                        gar,         ratio"'
ratio
types)         aries                        aries          (lb.)  (lb.) 
 (lb.)  (cwt.)  (lb.)                              (case)
$   $          $      $      $      %      %      %      %      cts.   Ct,.
   ets.    $     cis.   cts.    cIs'   cts.    cts.           %      %
1910-...........1.24                1.28   1.21    1.39   1.42     102  
  98    112    115   30.5   28.9    26.4   1.73----      15I.5   17.1   
14.1   13.3   3.60  .---      ---
1911-...........1.14                1.11    1.08   1.39   1.42      97  
  95    123    125   27.1    25.2   23.2   1.71   26.1    13.4   13.6   
11.2   10.1   3.45   51.3    195
1912.-----------1.30                1.41    1.24   1.45   1.48     108  
  95    112    112   30.6    28.5   26.7   1.82   29.5    15.9   17.3   
15.1   14.2   3.25   53.9    186
1913-...........1.33                1.31   1.20    1.52   1.57     88   
  97    114    118   32.6    29.4   27.4   1.88   31.0    14.9   16.9   
13.4   13.2   3.55   48.1    208
1914 -----------1.31                1.30   1.21    1.49   1.55     99   
  92    114    118   30.0    28.4   25.5   1.85   28.6    15.3   13.8   
12.6   11.1   3.40   53.5    187
191S5...........1.30                1.30    1.20   1.37   1.43    100   
  92    105    110   30.3    28.3   25.9   1.85   28.9    14.7   15.9   
13.0   12.3   3.05   52.5    197
1916 -1.55-------            IS     1.60    1.42   1.63   1.60     10.3 
  92    103    103   34.9   32.1    29.4   1.89   31.9    18.1   24.1   
17.0   16.0   3.65   58.7    178
1917.-----------2.14                2.22    1.85   2.37   2.31     104  
  88    III    108   45.3    40.6   36.8   2.28   41.0    23.5   28.7   21.4
   21.4   5.20   57.3    174
1918 -----------             5.3    2.53   2.20    2.73   2.86     100  
  87    108    113   54.0    48.2   44.4   2.77   49.5    27.1   35.4   24.6
   23 .2  5.70   54.7    183
1919 -----------2.83                2.77   2.50    3.18   3.48      98  
  88    112    122   64.9    57.7   53.3   3.13   57.6    29.9   43.5   28.2
   28.3   6.50   51.9    193
1920 ...........2.60                2.30   2.53    2.84   3.23     88   
  97    109    124   62.9    59.1   55.5   3 .42  55.7    26.2   31.0   23.4
   25.3   6.15   44 .8   224
1921 ...........             1.69   1.53    1.72   1.82   1.90     91   
 102    108    118   41.7    41.7   37.9   2.83   41.7    18.4   28.7   
16.8   18.8   5.45   44 .2   227
1922.-----------1.66                1.64    1.62   1.72   1.83     99   
  98    104    110   39.0    38.6   35.9   2.52   398.2   19.3   21.9   
18.9   17.8   4.35   49.2    203
1923-...........2.09                2.02   1.97    2.29   2.38     97   
  94    110    114   46.8    45.7   42.2   2.78   46.0    22.2   30.0   21.6
   23.0   4.85   48.2    207
1924 -----------1.77                1.57   1.78    1.84   2.13     89   
  99    104    120   43.6   42.5    39.8   2.49   41.2    18.2   23.1   
18.4   17.4   4.40   44.2    228
1925.-----------1.90                1.89   1.87    2.04   2.08     99   
  98    107    109   46.3   44.2    41.9   2.5    44.     21.5   23.8   
19.4   19.9   4.50   48.8    208
1926 -----------1.90                1.81   1.88    2.04   2.25     95   
  98    107    118   45.7   43.9    41.3   2.50   42.8    20.2   26.3   
19.1   20.8   4.60   47.2    212
1927.------        ----2.11         2.05   2.02    2.24   2.34     97   
  96    108    III   50.3    47.0   43.7   2.52   45.8    22.7   28.0   21.4
   20.2   4.70   49.8    202
1928 -----------2AS                 2.02   2.04    2.28   2.39     94   
  95    108    III   51 .5   47.8   45.6   2.55   46.0    22.1   28.7   21.4
   20.8   4.55   48.0    208
1929           . ---------2.05      1.83    1.83   2.12   2.43     89   
  94    103    119   48.7    40.5   45.2   2.57   43.6    20.1   28.9   
10.1   19.5   4.30   48.0    218
1930o-----------1.63                1.49    1.54   1.61   2.12      91  
  94    104    130   38.8    37.0   34.5   2.28    35.3   16.4   25.7   
18.0   18.4   3.90   48.4    215
1931           .            1.15--------  IJ  1.07  1.12  1.23  1.58  93
  97    109    137   28.7   27.8    24.8   1.70   27.0    IZ.5   21.2   
12.1   13.5   3.30   48.1    216
1932 ...........              .89     .81    .83    .92   1.28      91  
  93    103    144   21.4    20.7   17.9   1.29   20.1     9 .9  16.0   
 8.9    9.4   2.60   49.5    203
1933.-----------              .98     .91    .90   1.04   1.25     93   
  92    108    128   22.9    21.8   18.8   1.29   20.8    10.2   17.5   
10.0   11.5   2.55   49.0    204
1934.-----------1.09                1.00    1.04   1 .15  1.39     92   
  95    108    128   26.3   24 .9   22.7   1.52   24.8    11.7   18.6   
10.6   11.2   2.70   47.4    212
1935.-----------1.32                1.27    1.23   1.35   1 .55    98   
  93    102    117   31.5    29.8   28. 1  1.71   28.8    14.4   19.0   
13.8   13.8   2.91   49.9    200
1936                         1 .51  1.42    1.45   1.60   1.80     94   
  98    106    119   36.1   33.1 ----       ---32.0       15.3   22.5   
14.3   15.1   3.26   47.8    209
January -1.5------         IS     1.51   1.49    1.88   1.80     96     
94    101    114   37.    3 4.    33.5   1.93   33.6    15.8   21.3    14.4
  15.8   3.15   47.0    213
February.--------1.51             1.38   1.51    1.85   1.78     91     100
   109    118   38.    38.     34.9   1.95   35.6    14.0   23.5   13.1 
  15.0   3.I5   39.3    254
March ---------1.43               1.3U)  1.37   1.57    1.71     91     98
    110    120   37.    3.3.    31.7   1.83   31.1    13.8   21.0   13.0
   15.0   3.15   44.1   227
April.------         --1.32       1.19   1.29    1.44   1.61     90     98
    109    122   35.    33.     31.2   1.74   29.7    13.0   23.5   12.1
   14.8   3.15   43.8   229
May.----------1.26                1.13   1.22    1.35   1.58     93     93
    105    122   39.    28.     27.1   1.88   25.3    13.0   20.2   12.0
   13.8   3LIS   49.4    202
June.---------1.34                1.27   1.30    1.38   1.59     95     
97    103    119   31.    23.     27.7   1.64   28.9    14.4   18.5   13.5
   13.0   3.15   49.8    201
July ----------           l.52    1.43   1.45   1.80    1.77     94     95
    105    218   38.    31.     32.6   1.83   33.4    16 8   19.5   15.5
  13.5    3.30   50.3    190
August.--------1.66               1.58   1.51    1.77   1.93     94     96
    107    118   39.    38.     35.7   1 .85  34.9    17.8   22.2   18.5
   18.0   3.40   50.8    197
September.-------1.71             1.60   1.81    1.82   2.02     94     94
    108    118   41.    38.     35.5   2.04   33.9    17.2   21.0   18.0
   18.5   3.40   50.8    197
October.--------1.66              1.57   1.52   1.73    2.04     95     92
    104    123   38.    33.     33.5   2.01   31.4    15.3   21.0   15.2
  18.5    3.40   51.9   193
November -------1.67              1.58   1.57    1.71   2.02     95     94
    102    121   37.    34.     33.1   2.08   32.6    16.0   21.0   14.8
   15.8   3 38   49.1   204
December.-------1.67              1.58   1.53   1.72    2.03     95     95
    103    122   38.    34.    33.6    2.09   33.1    16.0   21.0   15.0
  15.5    3.30   48.3   207
1937
January I--------            1.67' 1 .57' 1 .58' 1 .71' 2 .03*     94'  
  95'   102' 122'     38.    35.    34.3    2 .07' 33.0   16.0    21 .8 
15 .0  15.5   3.30    48.4   208
For monthly quotations prior to 1932 and detailed information regarding sources
on all
commodities except condensed milk and milk used for butter, see Bulletins
g0, 120, and
140, Wisconsin Crop and Livestock Reporting Service.
Quotations are the average for the month as reported by Wisconsin crop correspondents.
'Milk prices are averages reported by farmers without reference to test.
The weighted an-
nual average test of Wisconsin milk as reported for the various outlets is
as follows: Milk
for cheese, 3.52 percent fat; butter, 3.69 percent fat; condenseries, 3.64
percent fat;market
milk, 3.71 percent fat; and average of all uses, 3.60 percent fat. Annual
averages are com-
puted by weighting monthly average prices by milk production per cow.  Tests
reported
by crop correspondents tend to be slightly above state averages, especially
during the
witer.
'Quotations refer to the 15th ofthe month as reported by Wisconsin anid United
States
price reporters. Annual prices, exceist the Wisconsin farm butter price,
are weighted
averages of monthly data. For the U. S. milk for fluid use is the chief outlet
for whole
milk sold, hence the U. S. farm price exceeds Wisconsin where the bulk of
the output is
manufactured.
*AIlannualquotationsexceptSwiss cheesearestraight averages ofmontlhlyprices.
'Wholesale price of 92-score butter at Chicago.
6Wholesale pricesonuthe Wiscsusin cheeseexchaiige. P'rior to April, 1928prices
were quoted
on daisies, thereafter on twins.
pAverages of weekly quotations published in the Green Couity Herold, Monroe,
Wisconsin,
and other sources. Yeariy averages are derived by weightiiig monthly average
prices by
marketings. From January 1910 to October 1933 quotations on No. 1 Swiss were
used
when available; after October 1933 prices are Fancy B grade Swiss.
'Averages of weekly qucstaions at Monroe, Wiscoisin from the Green County
Herold.
'Wholesale prices o1 advertised brands per case of 48 tall cais. Irices from
1910 to 1920,
I'el. are  aaufa.cturer's prices as published ii Federal Trade Commission
Report on Milk
and Milk 1'roducts. Quotatiomis frons 1921 to date are wholesale prices per
case iii car-
load lots at New York City as published by the Evaporated Milk Association.
Size of can
was changed from 1800z. to 14Y 00. i0 January, 1931.
"Prices of American eheese (twins) oii the Woiscousio Cheese Exchange
at Plymouth divided
by the price of 92-score butter at Chicago, as published in this table to
1920, but followiiig
that basic prices are carried further decimally.
'3relimoinary.
the United States are shown in the ac-
companying table.
MIlk Produetlio
Feb. 1
Feb. 1 1937 ast
Feb. 1 Feb. 1 1925-34 percent
1937  1936 average of 19:149
wi"Conslsa:
1'er faris 213.7 203.8  221.2  104.9
Per cow
milked   21.35 20.05  21.90  103.4
Per e 0 io
1ii herd  15.21  14.42  15.04  105.5
Usnlteed Stultes:
O'er e o w
Iss herd  11.90  11.60  12.43  102.0
United States Milk Production
With the high prices prevailing for
feed, the amount of grain being fed to
milk cows is unusually low this win-
ter.  Crop reporters for the United
States show an average of only 3.89
pounds per cow, which except fuir the
winter following the drought of 1934
is the lowest since these records are
kept. Winter weather conditions, how-
ever, have been rather mild and the
milk production per cow has been above
a year ago in spite of the small re-
duction ii the number of milk cows
ani the reduction in the amount of
grain fed per cow. Supplies of hay
antd forage are nmore abuindaelnt than
grain supplies with the result that
moire of these feeds are utilized, and
with the generally moderate weather
which has prevailed milk production
hais been kept up to al poilnt where it is
estimated to be about I l)eFCeL't greater
tlsIan a year ago.
EGG PRODUCTION
Favorable weather during January
stimulated egg production per hen to
the highest February 1 level on record.
On February 1, the reported egg pro-
duetioti per 100 liens aind pullets aver-
aged 10.3 l)ercent higher thaso a year
earlier amid 3.2 perceiit above the pre-
vious Februaty high point in 1933.
Because of a very unfavorable feed-
egg ratio since the drought of last sum-
mer, flocks which had reached record
size during most of 1936 have now been
culled drastically until the average
farm  flock size is showing a ratler
sharp seasonal decline.
In spite of the current reduction in
the average size of the flocks, they are
still about 1 pereeiat larger than a year
ago and substantially above the 5-year
average. Egg production on February
1 was 11.4 percent higher than a year
ago and well above the 5-year average.
Farmers will no doubt continue to cull
throughout the winter if feed prices
remain high.
Because of the high price of feeds
the feed-egg ratio was the most unfa-
vorable December ratio of record. Dur-
ing December 10 dozen eggs would buy
only 144 pounds of standard poultry ra-
tion compared with the previous low of
145 pounds in December 1934 following
the drought of that year. Last Decem-
ber 10 dozen eggs would buy 233 pounds
of feed. Although the record egg pro-
duction helps to pay the feed bill, the
margin above feed costs, if there is asy,
is far below what it was a year ago.
Chicken  prices increased about 11
percent during the month ending Jan-
uary 15. In spite of this increase to
13.1 cents per pound they were still be-


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