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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XVI ([covers January 1937/December 1937])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XVI, no. 2,   pp. [9]-16 PDF (4.0 MB)


Page [9]


STATE DOCUMENT
W1S, TFC. R1FF TIJBRAFL
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MABKE'rs
Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
W D. RORMUTH. Junior Statistician
FRANCIS J. GRAHAM, Junior Statistician
Vol. XVI, No. 2                State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin        
   February, 1937
ESTIMATES of the annual livestock
inventory in Wisconsin show a
number of changes, most of which are
rather small, from the situation which
prevailed a year ago. More horses
and cattle were on the farms of the
state at the beginning of the year
than a year ago but there were fewer
hogs and sheep.    The increase in
horses in the state is estimated at 1
percent, that of cattle 2 percent. For
hogs the estimated decrease is 5 per-
cent and for sheep 4 percent.
For the United States the changes
from a year ago are likewise rather
small. There are fewer horses, mules,
cattle, and hogs on the nation's farms
but there are more sheep now than a
year ago. Changes for the different
species are not large. The decrease in
horses and hogs is less than 1 percent,
for cattle and mules less than 2 per-
cent. The increase in sheep is slightly
over 1 percent. When the nation's
livestock is reduced to an animal unit
basis the total decline is 1.4 percent.
This makes the 1937 livestock esti-
mates for the United States the low-
est in terms of animal units since
1929.
1936 Drought Reduces Livestock
With the extreme drought condi-
tions which were widespread in 1936,
the feed supplies have been generally
short with the result that feed prices
have been high as compared with live-
stock prices. It has been difficult for
livestock men to purchase feed for the
maintenance of livestock and some
animals have been marketed for that
reason. The marketings of certain
classes of livestock have been espe-
cially heavy in recent months.
It appears that this unfavorable re-
lationship between feed prices and the
prices of livestock will continue into
the early part of 1937. Later in the
year if feed supplies become reason-
ably plentiful, this situation is likely
to be reversed because livestock pro-
ducers will have disposed of most of
the surplus animals and they will be
engaged in rebuilding their herds and
flocks. If crops are moderately good,
feed supplies will probably become
lower in price and livestock prices in
1937 may be expected to show more
strength. In many respects the situ-
ation resembles that following the
great drought of 1934 when extensive
liquidation of livestock was made
necessary by short feed supplies. Such
marketings usually take place at
IN THIS ISSUE
1937 Livestock Estimates
Changes in livestock numbers
are s m a ll this year. The
United States shows declines
in all species except sheep and
Wisconsin shows increases in
cattle and horses but declines
in hogs and sheep.
February Dairy Report
With moderate weather milk
production is well maintained
in spite of less grain feeding
and a slight reduction in cow
numbers.
Egg Production
Egg production is being well
maintained, though feed prices
are high compared with egg
prices.
Potato, Cabbage, and Onion
Stocks
Wisconsin farm stocks of po-
tatoes, cabbage, and onions
are smaller than usual as a
result of reduced production
and heavier early marketings.
Potato Utilization
Indicated shrinkage of United
States potatoes from the 1936
crop smaller than normal.
1937 Potato Acreage to Increase
Sharply
Marked increases in p o t a t o
acreage intended by growers
in nearly all states this year.
Prices Farmers Receive and Pay
Except for milk and eggs farm
products show higher prices,
while prices paid for com-
modities bought remain un-
changed.
Current Changes
Higher farm prices, larger stor-
age stocks of poultry and
dairy products than a year
ago, increased business activ-
ity, and improved industrial
employment are noted.
somewhat depressed prices but when
the marketings decline the prices us-
ually respond.
This situation is reflected in the
farm value of the livestock on hand at
the beginning of the year. The ag-
gregate value of farm animals is
lower for both Wisconsin and the
country as a whole. It is of interest
to note that the value of horses is
higher, generally, while other species
are lower in value.
Cattle. The cattle population in
Wisconsin at the beginning of the
present year is estimated to be 2 per-
cent larger than a year ago, which
brings the state total to 3,242,000
head. With the exception of the 3-
year period from  1932-34, inclusive,
this is the highest number of cattle
in the state's history.
For the United States a decline of
1.9 percent in cattle is estimated.
This decline is greatest in the Western
Corn Belt States where the drought
greatly affected feed supplies. Cattle
numbers show increases in most of the
New England States, in the Lake
States - Michigan, Wisconsin, and
Minnesota-and a few of the Southern
and Southwestern States. While many
states show decreases in cattle num-
bers, the changes are generally small
except in the Western Corn Belt
Group where the reduction in cattle
numbers is quite marked. In North
Dakota, for example, the decline is 10
percent, in Nebraska 13 percent, and
in Montana 22 percent.
Milk Cows. As in the case of all
cattle there is a reduction in the esti-
mated number of milk cows for the
United States, the decrease taken be-
ing 1.6 percent. Again the number of
milk cows shows a definite increase in
the New England States, in Michigan
and a few of the Southern and West-
ern States. Most of the states show
Weather Summary, January, 1937
Station
Duluth   .
Escanaba - -- -
Minneapolis --
La Crosse-
Green Bay.
Dubuque-
Madison-
Milwaukee ....
Temperature
IDerees Fahrenheit
U
28
37
35
40
38
39
44
a4
3.3
14.6
5.4
10.0
15.2
16.6
16.3
23.1
z
7.
15.4
12.1
16.1
15.
19 .1
16.
ZO.1
I-i
-24
- 13
-if
-23
- 14
-_
-1I
Preci-itation
Inches
1.99 0.97 +1 .
2.69 1.49 +1.
1.24 0.86 +0.
2.48 1.08 +1.
2.43 1.54 +0.
3.44 1.30 +2.
3.31 1.38 +11.
3.12 1.781+1.
aI
02
20
38
40
89
14
93
34
. .
l
8
_._
_
:3


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