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Wisconsin bankers' farm bulletin
(1913-1919)

Daniels, Amy L.
Wisconsin bankers' farm bulletin. Bulletin 47: Wisconsin's best crop--the child: 1. it's food PDF (1.0 MB)



lest he get too -little of the other materials necessary to build his bones
and
tissues properly. The lump of sugar or piece of candy at the end of a meal
may be beneficial, provided, of course, the child has eaten enough of the
other
foods served. A small amount of sugar on the cereal may encourage the child
to eat what otherwise he would reject, but care should be taken that there
is
not an undue amount of sugar, or that the child is not eating sugar and leaving
cereal.
                    WHAT CHILDREN SHOULD DRINK
    The modern mother needs to give special consideration to the beverages
her children are given. Tea and coffee no longer form any part of a child's
          diet. They are not foods-only stimulants, and under no conUditio
sould they
          be given to children, even those of high school age. Chocolate
and cocoa may
          be given in moderate amounts to the older child. In both of these
are con-
          tained a stimulating material similar to that in tea and coffee
but in lesser
          amounts' Sometimes very small amounts of cocoa are added to the
milk for
          younger children in order to get them to take more milk. Only under
such
          conditions is this permissible.
              A liberal amount of'water should, in all cases, be given. This
may be
           taken not only between meals but with meals as well. Care, however,
should
           be exercised that the water is taken between bites, and that it
is not used to
           wash the food down. Children must be taught that food must be
thoroughly
           chewed. Soft drinks, except those made from fruits, as lemonade
and orange-
           ade, or grape juice and the like, should be prohibited. Many mothers
are not
!I4        aware that root beer may contain a considerable amount of alcohol.
This, as
,|         well as all other alcoholic beverages, should be forbidden.
;1
                             HOW MUCH SHOULD CHILDREN EAT?
               All children should be given three meals a day, and the amount
given
           should be fairly evenly distributed among the three meals except
for the under-
           nourished child. Between-meal lunches should be discouraged. The
habit
           among high school children, especially, of going to school without
breakfast or
           with a cup of coffee and a slice of toast is dangerous. A goodly
portion of our
           girls who fail to complete their high school courses because of
il health or low
           grades are under nourished. This does not mean that the home is
not supply-
           ing enough food, but that the home does not see that the girl
gets enough ot
           the right kind of food. Success In all phases of life means adequate
nourish
           ment. Food faddists are in danger of being under nourished.
                ,A normal healthy child seldom eats too much, although he
may eat toe
            much of one kind of food of which he is particularly fond. Only
candy need
            be cited as an example. Good food habits should be taught early
and the chit
            dren should learn to eat a variety of foods. Nutritional safety
lies in a'fairly
            liberal supply of a variety of foods. If a person eats a variety
of foods, he o'
            she is much more likely to get some of all the necessary food
substances thai
            in cases where the variety is limited.
                  I
7'r
lest he' get too -little of the other materials necessary to build his bones
and
tissues properly. The lump of sugar or piece of candy at the end of a meal
may be beneficialprovided, of course, the child has eaten enough of the other
foods served. A small amount of Sugar on the cereal may encourage the child
to eat what otherwise he would reject, but care should be taken that there
is
not an undue amount of sugar, or that the child is not eating sugar and leaving
cereal.
                    WHAT CHILDREN SHOULD DRINK
    The modern mother needs to give special consideration t the beverages
bpr children are given. Tea and coffee no longer form any part of a child's
                                             -   -      - ---- -U-1.4 +U-
lest he get too -little of the other materials necessary to build his bones
and
tissues properly. The lump of sugar or piece of candy at the end of a meal
may be beneficial, provided, of course, the child has eaten enough of the
other
foods served. A small amount of Sugar on the cereal may encourage the child
to eat what otherwise he would reject, but care should be taken that there
is
not an undue amount of sugar, or that the child is not eating sugar and leaving
cereal.
                    WHAT CHILDREN SHOULD DRINK
    The modern mother needs to give special consideration t the beverages
her children are given. Tea and coffee no longer form any part of a child's
diet. They are not foods---only stimulants, and under no condition should
they
be given to children, even those of high school age. Chocolate and cocoa
may
be given in moderate amounts to the older child. In both of these are con-
tained a stimulating material similar to that in tea and coffee but in lesser
amounts. Sometimes very small amounts of cocoa axe added to the -milk for
younger children in order to get them to take more milk. Only under such
conditions is this permissible.
     A liberal amount of'water should, in all cases, be given. This may be
 taken not only between meals but with meals as well. Care, however, should
 be exercised that the water is taken between bites, and that It is not used
to
 wash the food down. Children must be taught that food must be thoroughly
 chewed. Soft drinks, except those made from fruits, as lemonade and orange-
 ade, or gmpe juice and the like, should be prohibited. Many mothers are
not
 aware that root beer may contain a considerable amount of alcohol. This,
as
 well as all other alcoholic beverages, should be forbidden.
                   HOW MUCH SHOULD CHILDREN EAT?
      All children should be given three meals a day, and the amount given
  should be fairly evenly distributed among the three meals except for the,
under-
  nourished child. Between-meal lunches should be' discouraged. The habit
  among high school children, especially, of going to school without breakfast
or
  with a cup of coffee and a slice of toast is dangerous. A goodly portion
of our
  girls who WI to complete their high school courses because of til health
or low
  grades are under nourished. This does not mean that the home is not SUPPIY-
  Ing enough food, but that the home does not see thatthe girl gets enough
ot
  the right kind of food. Success In all phases of life means adequate nourish
  ment. Food faddists are in danger of being under nourished.
      ,A normal healthy child seldom eats too much, although he may -eat,
toc
  much of one knd of food of which he is particularly fond. Only candy need
  be cited as an example. Good food habits should be taught early and the
chil-
  dren should learn to eat a variety of foods. Nutritional safety lies in
afairly
  liberal supply of a variety of foods. If a person eats a variety of foods,
he'o,
  she la much more likely to get some of all the necessary food substances
their
  in cases where the variety is limited.


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