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Wisconsin bankers' farm bulletin
(1913-1919)

Oosterhuis, A. C.
Wisconsin bankers' farm bulletin. Bulletin no. 15: how to get milk and money makers PDF (1006.7 KB)



      How to Get Milk and Money Makers.
                       By A. C. Ooaterhuis
    Every cow which is kept upon a Wisconsin farm should be a profit
producer. She should repay her owner for every pound of feed, every
                  hour of labor and also interest on his investment
A Good Cow Is    Practically every herd has its star boarder, the cow
a Money Maker    that does not pay for her feed. Keeping such cowa
                  is a bad business proposition. Know your cows in-
dividually by the use of the scales and the Babcock test. Cows should
be checked up to see that
they are paying market
prices or better for the feed
they  consume.    With   a
record of the milk and
butterfat production of each
cow and the approximate
price paid for the feeds, the
selection of stock for the
future herd is less difficult
and advancement is more
certain. With good founda-
tion stock, intelligent care,
breeding and feeding, suc-
cess in dairying will be in-
sured.
    The Wisconsin farmer
should grow his herd; of
necessity some cows will
                    h av e
Buy the Best and   to be
Breed Them Better  bought
                    for a
foundation. In buying, get
the best producers avaniaDLe,
and remember that the poor-        LOOK FOR LARGE NOSTRILS.
eat are most conspicuous on
the market. After the herd  To be healthy any auimual nust have the capacity
is established, weed out by   for taking in large quantities of fresh air
means of the Babcock test         which is used in purifying the blood.
and milk scales the unprofit-
able producers and only keep those which are paying for their feed and
care. Mate these cows with a properly selected sire and raise well the
heifer calves which you get from them. A very ordinary herd can soon
be cheaply developed into high producers by following this method.
    The sire is half, some say three-fourths of the herd. He must be
pure-bred, and registered, and represent well the dairy breed which you
                  prefer. His heifers should produce more milk and
What a Dairy     perhaps higher testing milk than their dams. Select-
Sire Should Be   ing just a registered bull will not do this. Find out
                  the sire's qualifications by knowing the test and pro-
duction records of his dam and grand-dams. These records should be
better than those of your best cows if you are to increase the pro-
ductiop of your herd. Be sure, too, that the constitution and breeding
vitaiity of his dam was such as you wish established in your herd.
    Size and constitution can be obtained together with quality and


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