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Wisconsin bankers' farm bulletin
(1913-1919)

Moore, R. A.
Wisconsin bankers' farm bulletin. Bulletin no. 1: now is the time to test seed corn PDF (896.8 KB)



          IMPORTANCE OF TESTING SEED CORN
  An increased yield of corn can be secured by testing each ear before plant-
ing, and rejecting those ears that (lo not germinate or that show lack of
vigor or vitality. It is not such a tedious and difficult task to test each
ear
of seed corn as farmers are sometimes led to believe. Fifteen average ears
of corn wvill plant one acre using four kernels to the hill, placing the
corn
three and one-half feet apart between the rows. 'When the importance of
planting ear-tested seed corn is fully realized few farmers N ill plant corn
without first submitting it to the test.
               SELECTING EARS FOR TESTING
  Onily the most nearly perfect seed ears, having kernels of a uniform %vidth,
should be saved for seed. These should be selected from the store-room ati(i
mnay be laid out on the floor or on tables to be convenient for making the
test. Care should be taken to place the ears in a building wvlhere they will
not be disturbed durimig the period of the test, for. if disarranged before
coln-
parison can be made, the result of the test cannot be determined.
  The ears nmay be arranged in sections of ten to correspond with the sections
in the seed tester which are usually in tens. A nail should be driven
between each section and the various sections, an(d each individual ear of
each section should be mnubered. At least four kernels (sometimes six) are
taken singly from different parts of each ear and place(d directly in front
of
the ear fromn which taken until kernels have been removed front all ears.
                   THE SEED CORN TESTER
  Mlany devices have been recommended for the testing of seed corn, nearly
all of whichl have morey or less mnerit. However, after using mnanly diflerent
kinds of testers we find that the common square box tester shlown m ill
Figure 1., is the best.
Figure 1. A simple box tester for seed corn  UTpon muslin cloth squareg'are
drawn and
trumbered, upon which are laid the kernels from each ear to be tested  When
tile tester is
filled a sawdust pad is placild on top to keep the grain moist.
  A  suitable box for miaking gernination    tests can be inade fronm any
commion boards or siding.  This is a box 2fOx40 iniches and usually six inches
deep.  Sawdust is all excellent imaterial to use as a' germination bed but
it
should first be boiled in water in order to kill bacteria and mnoulds.  
The
sawdust should be placed in the box about three inches deep anti shoulldt
be
moist but not soggy.


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