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Annual report, 1939: St. Croix Co. Agricultural Agent
(1939)

A quarter century of extension work in St. Croix County Wisconsin,   pp. [1]-6 PDF (1.7 MB)


Page [1]


                 A QTJARTER CENTURY OF EXTENSION WORK
                   Di ST. CROIX COUNTY WISCONSIN
      It is a matter of record that on May a, 1914, President
 Woodrow Wilson signed the Siiith-Lever Act which made possible
 cooperative extension work in all counties in the United States.
 Extension work in Wisconsin had started prior to this. Ihis
 work was originally started in this state with men such as E.
 L. Luther, first County Agent in Wiscuiisin.  His work began
 in Oneida County in 1912 under the direction of the local Ag-
 ricultural Committee.
      Extension work on a county basis was begun in St. Croix
 county on May 24, 1917 when T. M. Olson was hired as a full-
 time County Agricultural Agent. He served in this capacity
 until September 22, 1919. His work was typical of work being
 carried on during war-boom days. St. Croix county was in the
 midst of an expanding agriculture. Wheat was still a profit-
 able crop and more land was cleared to raise wheat. Dairying
 was expanded. The work of this County Agent was to promote an
 expanding agriculture in the county and to correlate the federal
 move for more crops for food and more men for the army. This
 left more work for fewer people. It was at a time when the at-
 titude of the American people was "salute the flag and raise
 more crops." The fore-runner of 4-II clubs was begun at this
 time in the form of corn and garden crops.
     A. W. Knott surved as the second County Agricultural Agent
for this county, beginning his work on February 15, 1920 and
terminating his contract on December 31, 1922. Upon his shoul-
ders fell the first responsibility of helping to adjust farm in-
comes, farm prices, and farm trends in a changing agriculture.


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