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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / The Wisconsin horticulturist: issued monthly, under the management of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society for the purpose of disseminating the horticultural information collected through the agency of the society
Vol. I, No. 6 (August 1896)

A Delaware vineyard,   pp. 13-16 PDF (793.3 KB)


From our neighbors,   pp. 16-19 PDF (785.5 KB)


Page 16


WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY.
Secv. Latham: There is a great deal of room wasted in a
vinevard. Myv oldest vinevard is planted in rows six feet apart
and the vines eight feet apart in the row. I never had any
vinevaid bear any more, and it continues to bear. The ex-
hibit of Mr. Loudon, in the other room, is taken from that
vinevard. The vines do not seem to be too near. The only
difficultv is there is not earth enough to cover them. M1y lat-
est experience is in planting them seven feet apart each way.
A vine seven feet long is also easier to handle.
FROM OUR NEIGHBORS.
C. G. Patten, a former Wisconsin nurseryman and fruit
grower, now of C11arles City, Iowa, writes under date of
July lth, '96: Blight is the worst here I have ever known
it; bad enough last year in nursery and orchard, but worse
in this region than last  Nearly all varieties have suffered
more or less. My Greening is about as exempt from rav-
ages a. is the Duchess.
31'. 1P. V. Collins, of the Northwestern Agriculturist of
M1hineapolis. writes under date of August 6, TV6: A. J. Philips,
Editor and Manager of MWisconsin Horticulturist-Am much
pleased with the cut of the cherry orchard of A. D. Barnes
as it appeared in Your Julv issue, and would like verv much
to secure it for use in our paper. Will give it a good position
and publiSh description of same.  The plate has been for-
warded.
From the report of the veteran horticuilrist of Minnesota,
Mr. J. S. Harris, "at their annual meeting, I find the follow-
ing items relative to Wisconsin fruits:
"At the Wisconsin State Fair there was a remarkably fine
collection of Oldenberg seedlings, seven varieties, produced
by Joseph Zettel, of Sturgeon Bay, Wis. So fine and valuable
a collection from that one varietv has never before been pro-
duced by one man. The prospect for raising an abundance
of the finest apples here in the cold north is growing brighter,
16


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