University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Annual report of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society for the year ending July 1, 1921
Vol. LI (1921)

Koch, H. F.
Outdoor rose growing,   pp. 157-168 PDF (3.0 MB)


Page 166


166          FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF
Now, it may seem from what I have said that the requirements
of outdoor rose growing are somewhat exacting. However, this
is not at all the case, and the work of caring for the plants ex-
tends over the entire growing period, and when you consider the
results obtained and the fact that you can have roses in bloom
from spring until freezing time, you can readily see that the care
and attention that it is necessary to give the plants are well
worth while. Right here in Wisconsin-not alone in the south-
ern section, but also in the northern part-I have seen roses
growing and blooming to perfection. I have seen them as far
north as Marquette, Michigan. The blooms which I saw at
Marquette were very fine, and about as perfect as produced by
the professional hot house grower.
The climbers grew to a length of from twenty to twenty-five
feet. They were planted in sandy soil, which is all the more
remarkable, as roses are supposed to give the best results in heavy
clay soil.
I have seen roses in bloom in the south, and in the east, and
various other sections of this state; but the finest blooms of
hybrid teas I saw at Lake Nashota, hybrid perpetuals grown by
a friend in my home town of Wauwatosa. My roses are a con-
stant delight to me, from the time the first flowers scent the
atmosphere with their wealth of bloom, and then along through
June and July-the climbers, large and small flowered, each in
its turn, and the hybrid teas-until they cease blooming in the
late fall because they must go into winter quarters to rest for
the bloom which is sure to follow in the coming spring.
DISCUSSION
MR. CHRISTENSON: If you were going to grow one kind,
perpetuals, hybrid teas, or something else, what class would you
select? Most of us cannot have very many, and we would pos-
sibly only want one class.
MR. KOCH: If you are satisfied to have roses simply in June.
and a sprinkling of them in the fall, select any of the hybrid
perpetuals that are recommended.
ML CHRISTENSON: You said something about budded stock.
Is there not a danger that most amateurs may get into some
trouble with growth from below the bud?
MR. KOCH: I thought of that, and I am very glad you
brought that up. You can very readily detect the "stock" or
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


Go up to Top of Page