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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Annual report of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society for the year ending July 1, 1921
Vol. LI (1921)

What shall the farmers do with their orchards?,   pp. 148-152 PDF (1.3 MB)


Page 150


-
150          FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF
Now, that is all I am going to say on "What Shall We Do with
the Farm Orchard." The point I want to leave with you is this,
and then the evidence is going to be presented,-that it is high
time, recognizing that it is commercial orcharding that we want,
also recognizing that we have the farm orchard and we will al-
ways have the farm orchard, it is high time that we were getting
back of the movement and helping these men and helping to
spread the gospel of better orchard management among the farm
orchards, so that we have the foundation on which to build a
commercial orchard industry, and I believe confidently that that
is the principal means by which we may become what we hope
we will become and what we sometimes like to boast that we are
becoming, a great commercial horticultural state from the stand-
point of the fruit industry.
THE EVIDENCE
MR. ERNEST KREUL: I am only an amateur at the spraying
business. Last winter at our community meetings the county
agent brought up the subject of the home orchard; also brought
a photograph of some apples that had been sprayed and not
sprayed, so there were some that decided that we ought to start
a home community spraying outfit. Well, it dragged along, we
did not get started spraying until rather late; finally the agent
sent a university sprayer, and we missed our pink bud spray, but
we got in the sprays for the calyx, two sprays, the last spray in
July. Then our fruit, most of it, was damaged by the codling
moth to some extent, but that was because we did not spray at
the proper time. We were rather green at the business; did not
know how to go at it, then Mr. Keiffer came out, gave some in-
structions and then told us what to do to get good results. We
did not spray as thoroughly as we should, but I should say one-
third of our apples which were sprayed the best were not very
marketable, about two-thirds were. Some of the varieties did
not bear, some of the Wolf River did. We sold some of those;
I should say we picked about 12 bushels to put down cellar, and
we sold some for $1.50 a bushel. I think the Snow apples and
Greenings should be valued at $2.00 per bushel.
Then I took a little time in the spring to do some pruning,
pruned our orchard to the very best of our knowledge; then we
sprayed and the time and expense was about one-half of what
the apples were worth. Some of our trees we did not spray be-
cause they were in front of the bee hive and we were afraid of
[JIM-
150          FiFTY-FiRsT ANNUAL REPORT OF
Now, that is all I am going to say on 'VVhat Shall We Do with
the Farm Orchard." The point I want to leave with you is this,
and then the evidence is going to be presented,--that it is high
time, recognizing that it is commercial orcharding that we want,
also recognizing that we have the farm orchard and we will al-
ways have the farm orchard, it is high time that we were getting
back of the movement and helping these men and helping to
spread the gospel of better orchard management among the farm
orchards, so that we have the foundation on which to build a
commercial orchard industry, and I believe confidently that that
is the principal means by which we may become what we hope
we will become and what we sometimes like to boast that we are
becoming, a great commercial horticultural state from the stand-
point of the fruit industry.
THE EVMENCE
MR. ERNEST KREUL: I am only an amateur at the spraying
business. Last winter at our community meetings the county
agent brought up the subject of the home orchard; also brought
a photograph of some apples that had been sprayed and, not
sprayed, so there were some that decided that we ought to start
a home community spraying outfit. Well, it dragged along, we
did not get started spraying until rather late; finally the agent
sent a university sprayer,'and we missed our pink bud spray, but
we got in the sprays for the calyx, two sprays, the last spray in
July. Then our fruit, most of it, was damaged by the codling
moth to some extent, but that was because we did not spray at
the proper time. We were rather green at the business; did not
know how to go at it, then Mr. Keiffer came out, gave some in-
structions and then told us what to do to get good results. We
did not spray as thoroughly as we should, but I should say one-
third of our apples which were sprayed the best were not very
marketable, about two-thirds were. Some of the varieties did
not bear, some of the Wolf River did. We sold some of those;
I should say we picked about 12 bushels to put down cellar, and
we sold some for $1.50 a bushel. I think the Snow apples and
Greenings should be valued at $2.00 per bushel.
Then I took a little time in the spring to do some pruning,
pruned our orchard to the very best of our knowledge; then we
sprayed and the time and expense was about one-half of what
the apples were worth. Some of our trees we didnot spray be-.
cause they were in front of the bee hive and we were afraid of
getting stung. Those trees that we did not spray, most of the
fruit fell off in the summer and what stayed through till fall
was not worth picking, was all worrhy and had some scab on it
Al,


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