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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Annual report of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society for the year ending July 1, 1921
Vol. LI (1921)

Goff, M. B.
Marketing of Wisconsin apples,   pp. 81-92 PDF (3.1 MB)


Page 89


WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY
believe that the time is upon us now for concerted action. A
certain amount of inter-county activity is warranted. We in the
Sturgeon Bay area have held to a policy of proud self-sufficient
isolation, and have, if the truth were known, pursued the methods
of the conceited school boy. Perhaps you in other regions have
been similarly guilty. Good judgment, however, would bring
us into counsel on some of the related commercial phases of our
business.
One of these questions is the package cost. Probably all of
you except the Sturgeon Bay men cheerfully paid your dollar and
a half for barrels last fall. Doubtless some of you buy your
spray materials at retail prices, feeling as you do, so that you
owe some poor dealer a living. While I will not deny that you
do, I do deny that you owe it to the average dealer on such
wholesale items  as  spray  materials  and  packages.  It
would not be much of a trick to set up a Wisconsin Fruit
Growers' Cooperage Company. Its details could be worked out
very easily. Coopers are plentiful enough, and the Lord knows
they are talkative enough, to make it possible to run a shop of
our own. Ten thousand barrels or multiples thereof are most
convenient sized units to manufacture. The freight rates on slack
cooperage are so infinitely cheaper than those on madeup barrels,
that a shop properly located should pay us good- dividends, and
should relieve us of the necessity of depending on others for
barrels. Likewise the bushel basket is one of the most easily
made containers from the manufacturing standpoint. Quantity
contracts on these containers can not fail to give us advantages.
The L. C. L. purchase prices for baskets add a real tax upon our
business, In the matter of spray materials large volume pur-
chasing has a very distinct advantage. The various companies
are working hard to get association business, and care very little
for small orders upon which they levy sufficient profits to pay all
of the selling expense attendant to small volumes. I am not
necessarily suggesting that we establish a Fruit Growers' Supply
Company at the present time. But I am suggesting that some-
thing may be accomplished through agreements between us.
Probably in the Sturgeon Bay region our larger volume of some
of these articles makes us less dependent on this kind of co-
operation. If so we welcome you to work with us for our mutual
advantage.
89


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