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Wisconsin State Agricultural Society / Transactions of the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, including the proceedings of the state agricultural convention held in February, 1885, together with other practical papers
Vol. XXIII (1885)

Barry, A. C.
The agricultural outlook,   pp. 229-273


Page 270

270    WISCONSIN STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
have. The Dairymen's Association, and all the associations 
in special eallings,- äre throwino, a large amount of light on 
these special pursuits. The press of - the country, the agri- 
eultural papers, the stock papers, the papers given to'these 
special pursuits of farmers, are edueating thern all the time 
in vhe art of . farming, more rapIdly perhaps than any col- 
lege. - But still they do not. answer the purpose. What do 
we want? We want men that Iave a thorough education 
back on the farms; we want to. dignify the life of the 
country. We cannot do it by sending a man to the distriet 
school. You build up an agricultural college down on some 
Obscure corner, with three or four, perhaps obscure, profes- 
sors  If I understand, sorne of these gentlemen do not want 
these professors -to be edu Cated men. They want thern to 
be merely practieal. men. 
You start an institution at an'expense of $150,000 or $200,000 
and you get a course there, in a course of one or two years, 
about- equal to oDe of our high schpols, and those graduates 
go back to the farm. Are those men göing to assume the re- 
spectability of men that graduatein the university, and have 
a thorough course of education? You are going to thereby 
stigmatize the ao-ricultural profession. ý You are . going to 
say that it is inferior to, the other professions. You are go-ý 
ing to say the farmers' sons Pannot compete- with other 
men. I deny it. I disagree entirely with Mr. Sloan. He' 
says there is no science in aomriculture. I regard it as an art. 
Take. the university. There'are - professors of botan' y, of 
zoology, of mathematies, of history. Every one' of those 
branches lie at the * root, of agricultural education. T would 
be ashamed to recommend an education, inferior to that 
Every student if he is going into an agricultural edueation, 
has got to have edueation in thosebranches. Is he going to 
get it in two years? I want the farmer's..sons to come up 
and meet these universit men, and see that their ealling is 
as high as the othiers; ' that it involves as much study, as much 
time, and that they should have, the courage and manli- 
ness to stand up and say'that they believe in their profession. 
Mr. Broughton. 1 hoped this could be settled without any 
controversy; that the truth could' be succesefully used in 


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