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Wisconsin, its opportunities and inducements to home seekers : hundreds of thousands of acres of farming lands : no other locality can equal it
(1895)

Land and opportunities for thousands,   pp. [unnumbered]-11 PDF (896.1 KB)


Page 10


                            10
sections, there yet remain a score or more of counties which
are now going through the transformation from a lumbering
to a farming community. The manner in which the coun-
ties like Portage, Waupaca, Waushara and others have been
changed from what was considered a worthless area when the
timber was gone to a more prosperous section than they ever
were before, is simply an illustration of what will take place in
all of the counties in Northern Wisconsin, situated now as
those named were ten years ago.
  North of a line drawn east and west through the geograph-
ical center of the State is as yet a sparsely-settled country.
Within this radius there are many large cities and hundreds of
towns containing from three hundred to five'thousand popula-
tion, but nearly all of the population of the country is in these
towns. The cutting of timber from this section will last for a,
generation to come, and the clearing of the lands has and will
make opportunities for farmers that no prairie country can
surpass, if equal. There are many advantageous features for
farmers in the timber country which are not possessed by the
prairies: one is fuel in abundance; another, building material
from the clearings of one's own land. Anything that can be
grown on a prairie can be grown in timber countries; and
some things which can't be produced profitably elsewhere.
The country is more particularly adapted to diversified farm-
ing, which is much better than the dependence upon any one
kind of crop. The markets of Wisconsin offer tod the farmer
advantages that no other country at present possesses; the in-
numerable milling and mining towns make a market at the
  farmer's door, and the prices secured for the products are in-
  variably better than those paid for the same products in locali-
  ties where the farmer has to ship them to more populous
  centers.
    The State of Wisconsin is desirous of adding to its popula-
  tion more of the same class who have done so much to develop
  the State to its present position of thrift and Prosperity. To
  thonse people inethremana ce o   cnter of popuntie whoti
F-17 I'M MT 717W'7FT'
                             10
 sectionsIthere yet remain a Wore Or more of counties which
 are now going through the transformation from a lu
 to a farming community. The manner in which the coun-
 ties like porb4M Waupacaq Waushara and Others have been
 changed from what was considered a worthless are" when the
 timber was gone to a more Prosperous section than they ever
 were before) is simply an illustration of what will take pla4be in
 all of the counties in Northern Wiscousing situated now as
 those named were ten years ago.
   North of a line drawn east and west through the geograph-
 ical center of the State is as yet a sparsely-settled country.
 Within this radius the-re are many large cities and hundreds Of
 towns containing from three hundred to f've'thousb'nd popula-
 tion, but nearly all Of the Population of the country is in these
 towns. The cutting of timber from this section will last for a
 generation to come, and the clearing of the Ian& has and will
 make opportunities for farmers that no prairie country can
 surpass, if equal. There are many              features.for
 fartners in the timber country which are not possessed ky the
 prajes: one is fuel in abundance; AnOtheri building material
 f rom the clearings Of ones own land. Anything that can be
 grown on'a prairie can be grown in timber countries; and
 some thing,, which cau% be produced pr6fitably elsewhere.
 The e                                   to diversified farm-
       ,ountry is more particularly adapted
  ing, which is much better than the dependence upon any one
                         kets of WiSCOndu Off'r td the farmer
  kind of crop. The mar                     I   z     the in-
  advantages that no other country at Present Possess(*;
  numerable Milling and mining towns make% a 11aikbt at the
  fatmer's door, -and the Prices secured for the products aft in-
  variably better than those Paid for thesame products in locali:7
  ties where the farmer has to ship them to more Populous
  centers.
     The State Of WiwOusin is desirous of adding to its POpUI&-
   tion more of the same dam who have done so much, to develop
                                              - prosperity- TO
   the Stateto its present position Of thrift and 0pujst'mwhotA
                                  centers of PC
   those people- in -the-OvercrOwded      be            IboW
   harder for a me're subsistence than would  'Lecew*xy on


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