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Rahmlow, H. J. (ed.) / Wisconsin horticulture
Vol. XXX (September 1939/July-August 1940)

Wisconsin horticulture, vol. 30, no. 11: July-August, 1940,   pp. [305]-328


Page 310

 
WISCONSIN  HORTICULTURE 
IN THE ORCHARD 
THE RELATION OF THE SET 
    OF FRUIT TO QUALITY 
 W HEN too many apples are 
     allowed to develop upon a 
 tree, the crop averages too small 
 in size and lacks color and qual- 
 ity. Too thick a set of apples is 
 slower in coloring and ripening 
 than a set of the proper number 
 of fruits. Again, leaves upon a 
 tree are the source of starches 
 and sugars required by a tree and 
 its fruits. Too few leaves per 
 fruit means small and poor fruit. 
 You cannot increase the propor- 
 tion of leaves to fruit in any ade- 
 quate manner by nitrogen appli- 
 cations to a tree with too heavy 
 a set in June and July; in fact, 
 such a treatment tends to reduce 
 color and quality. In other words, 
 fertilization in midsummer is not 
 a remedy for too heavy a set. 
 In general, the greatest volume 
 of fruit per tree was obtained 
 when apples were thinned to 6 to 
 8 inches apart. 
 -Prof. M. A. Blake in New Jer- 
 sey State Horticultural Society 
 News. 
 CONSIDERABLE INTEREST 
    IN HARDY APRICOTS 
AS a result of the Wisconsin 
    Horticultural Society's rec- 
ommendation that the Scout apri- 
cot be tested in Wisconsin, 49 
members ordered from    1 to 2 
trees each, making a total of 95 
trees which were sent out to our 
members this spring. 
  Superintendent W. R. Leslie 
of the Dominion Experimental 
Farm at Morden, Manitoba, 
spoke at the Minnesota Short 
Course meeting this spring and 
stated that the Scout apricot de- 
veloped at the Morden Station in- 
troduced two years ago, is hardy 
enough to do well anywhere in 
Minnesota, and that in quality it 
will compare well with the larg- 
er varieties shipped in from the 
West, according to the Minne- 
sota Horticulturist for June. 
A PROMISING PEACH TREE 
M R. WESLEY REYNOLDS 
      of Warrens writes in May, 
 "I was interested in the article 
 "Why Peach Buds Winterkill" in 
 the May issue of Wisconsin Hor- 
 ticulture. I have two peach trees 
 propagated as chance seedlings, 
 that have enough good healthy 
 blossoms for a fair crop, although 
 perhaps 60% of the buds winter- 
 kill. For comparison, I have a 
 South Haven peach tree on which 
 the blossom buds all killed." 
 Since the temperature dropped 
 lower than 15 below zero last 
 winter, it would seem that the 
 peach tree seedlings which Mr. 
 Reynolds mentions might have 
 hardier blossom buds than the 
 standard varieties. It will be in- 
 teresting to watch. 
 Undoubtedly if we are ever to 
 have hardy peach trees in Wis- 
 consin it will have to be from 
 seedlings or from  crosses of 
 hardy varieties who s e flower 
 buds will withstand our winters. 
 SOIL TEMPERATURES AF- 
 FECTED BY CULTIVATION 
 A IR temperatures play a very 
    important part upon plant 
growth. The type of soil, the 
shade from the plant (not weeds), 
and the time and depth of culti- 
vation are factors that will in- 
fluence soil temperatures. Many 
of our plants thrive best when 
soil temperatures are from 75 to 
85 degrees, often growth stops 
at 95 degrees and death to roots 
at about 110 degrees. 
  Results from soil temperature 
readings during the year may 
vary from 25 to 30 degrees above 
during the winter months at a 
4-inch depth, up to 115 to 125 or 
130 degrees during the summer. 
   The more and deeper the cultiva- 
 tion and the warmer the air tem- 
 perature, the deeper will be the 
 penetration of the heat. After all 
 isn't weed control one of the most 
 important reasons for cultivation? 
 -From Hoosier Horticulture. 
 BEAVER STRAWBERRY 
   STILL LEADS IN COM- 
     MERCIAL SECTIONS 
T HE Beaver strawberry is still 
   the most popular in the com- 
mercial strawberry growing sec- 
tions, especially on lighter soil 
in the Bayfield, Sturgeon Bay, 
and Warrens areas. On the sand- 
ier soils the Beaver outyielded 
any other variety observed this 
year, and all growers contacted 
are holding to the Beaver as 
their first c h o i c e commercial 
strawberry. 
  Premier has second place in 
popularity and seems to do a lit- 
tle better on some heavier soils 
than the Beaver. 
  Catskill is popular in some sec- 
tions, especially Bayfield, where 
a number of growers are prepar- 
ing to have as their main crop 
next year, Beaver and Catskill. 
  Senator Dunlap still seems to 
be a good berry for the farm 
garden, and some excellent patch- 
es were noticed this year, es- 
pecially on heavy soils and where 
the patches are small. However. 
in the larger growing sections 
Senator Dunlap seems to be so 
subject to leaf spot that we saw 
patches which were practically a 
50% loss. The leaf spot stunted 
the berries and many failed to 
develop at all. 
  Most growers are discarding 
Dorsett and Fairfax. They arc 
high quality berries but fail to 
give good yields. 
JUJY-Au, ust, 1940 
310 


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