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Rahmlow, H. J. (ed.) / Wisconsin horticulture
Vol. XXX (September 1939/July-August 1940)

Wisconsin horticulture, vol. 30, no. 6: February, 1940,   pp. [145]-176


Page 153

 
WISCONSIN  HORTICULTURE 
   THE FRUIT SITUATION 
   By the U. S. Department of 
          Agriculture 
A LTHOUGH January 1 total 
     stocks of apples are indi- 
 cated to be slightly smaller than 
 a year earlier, exports of apples 
 in the first half of 1940 are ex- 
 pected to be reduced materially, 
 and the quantity of apples made 
 available for the domestic mar- 
 ket in the first half of 1940 prob- 
 ably will be at least one-fifth 
 larger than that made available 
 in the first half of 1939. Because 
 of this situation the Federal Sur- 
 plus Commodities Corporation is 
 continuing to purchase apples for 
 relief distribution. 
            Apples 
  Cold storage holdings of ap- 
ples on January 1 totaled 26.2 
million bushels as compared with 
31.0 million bushels on December 
I and 26.6 million on January 1, 
1939. The out-of-storage move- 
ment during December totaled 
about 4.8 million bushels, or 
somewhat more than the 4.3 mil- 
lion bushels moved out in De- 
cember 1938 and also more than 
the recent 5-year average for 
December of 4.2 million bushels. 
    GROWERS NEED NEW 
            MODELS 
     (Continued from page 151) 
 and might have spent his time 
 trying to sell the model of 1914 
 or insisting that the public was 
 all wrong in not appreciating 
 what he was giving them and in 
 not giving him "cost of produc- 
 tion." But if he had, other manu- 
 facturers would have had the 
 field to themselves. Likewise with 
 the fruit industry, it is well and 
 good to say we are entitled to a 
 fair price and all that, but if we 
face the facts and are honest with 
ourselves we will have to admit 
that the world in general does 
not care a Continental about the 
grower and his problems. We 
must do it ourselves. If we mere- 
ly sit and grumble, some other 
variety will step in and take the 
market from us. 
  From New York State Fruit 
News. 
  When God created man, He 
gave him two ends-one to sit 
on and one to think with. Ever 
since then, man's success or fail- 
tire has been dependent on the 
one he used most. 
DES * FUNGICIDES * SEED DISINFECTANTS 
The Corona Line consists of these well-known 
products. Rigid manufacturing control in- 
sures standardized quality and unfailing 
effectiveness. 
     Corona Dry Arsenate of Lead ... 
             For Fruit Trees 
       Corona Calcium Arsenate ... 
           For use on Potatoes 
Corona Bordeaux Mixture (13%    Copper) 
       Corona Lime-Sulphur (Dry) 
       Corona Tree Wound Dressing 
     Corona Merko . . . For Corn Seed 
            Corona Oats Dust 
Corona Copper Carb ... For Wheat Treating 
     Corona P.D. 7 . . . For Potatoes 
   PITTSBURGH 
   PLATE     GLASS     compnnv 
     .  CORONA CHEMICAL DIVISION - - - 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. .... NEWARK, N. J. 
  FRUIT GROWERS 
  Startling  New     Information 
Comparative trials reveal great differ- 
ence in trees grown on different root 
stocks-shows why some orchards are 
successful-others are failures. 
Complete List of New Fruits 
Prairie Spy Apple-Bantam   Pear-Ja- 
ponica Bush Cherry-Scout Apricot and 
other new fruits. 
Andrews Raspberry Plants 
     Send for Free Catalog 
  ANDREWS NURSERY 
Box 247-B    Faribault, Minn. 
I 
F, 
W 
February, 1940 
153 
I 
A . 


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