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Cranefield, Frederic (ed.) / Wisconsin horticulture
Vol. I (September 1910/August 1911)

Wisconsin horticulture, vol. 1, no. 1: September, 1910,   pp. [1]-8 PDF (3.6 MB)


Page 8

 
WISCONSIN HORTICULTURE 
     WHAT JOLLEGES DO FOR 
           AGRICULTURE 
  Measured by the amount saved to 
the   agriculturists of our country 
alone, as a direct result of experi- 
ments and training carried on in the 
colleges of the United States, the 
money invested in these institutions 
is paying high interest. 
  Professor A. Caswell Ellis of the 
University of Texas, describes an- 
nual losses of $5,000,000 in Califor- 
nia from the white scale, of $30,000,- 
000 in Texas from the cotton boll 
weevil, and of $40,000,000 in the 
South and Southwest from the cattle 
tick, which have either been materi- 
ally checked or entirely stopped as a 
direct result of laboratory  experi- 
ments and investigations in our col- 
leges and universities. 
  In the state of Illinois, which Pro- 
fessor Ellis uses as an illustration, 
$250,000 is invested in the study of 
agriculture. We read: 
   "By means of careful and intelli- 
 gent application of the laws of bot- 
 any and principles of heredity, Pro- 
 fessor Hopkins and his colleagues in 
 the university developed a new vari- 
 ety of corn and a new method of cul- 
 tivation especially adapted to condi- 
 tions of that state. This seed has 
 been distributed and this new method 
 taught to the farmers, and these are 
 now in use all over the state, with 
 the result that the average corn yield 
 in Illinois has been increased five 
 bushels per acre, or a total increase 
 for the entire state of forty-five mnil- 
 lion bushels per year. Omitting the 
 dozen other similar services rendered 
 to the state by this university, we see 
 that it returns in wealth to the state 
 each year more than fifty times the 
$250,000 spent in agricultural educa- 
tion." 
WINTER WHEAT 
      OLDS' IMPROVED 
        TURKISH RED. 
 TURKISH RED or Turkey Red has 
 proven the best variety of winter wheat 
 year after year under all conditions. 
 It is the HARDIEST variety, with- 
 standing the severest winters as well as 
 being practically rust proof. 
 It is a plump handsome appearing wheat 
 making the best quality of flour. 
 It OUTYIELDS all other wheat aver- 
 aging year after year as high as 30 to 40 
 busher per acre. Its yield record is given 
 as over 59 bushels per acre. 
 It is a bearded red wheat, growing a 
 =ton*if dtraw with large plump heavy 
 keelt has proven itself well adapted 
 to nearly all sections of Southern Wis- 
 consin. 
 Our IMPROVED TURKISH RED is 
 the PUREST and BEST. 
 Stock this year is unusually fine. Stw 
 in Sepmber or latter part of August, 
 If to 2 bushels per acre. 
          PRICES: 
Bushel $1.75; 2 1o 10 bushels at 
$1.80; 10 bushel or over at $1.50, 
bsp included. 
L. L. OLDS SEED COMPANY 
Drawer 65         Madiem, Wlsconsln 
MYERS' SPRA 
     FIG. 1303 
For spafa  atr 
Satin inimaf, I 
III, WNITEWAIIIII 
Made IN Stay alylm 
   all raqilramblt 
The Mereo Spray I 
that pump Easy 
  threw a fill flew. 
               wrtM for a MYERS Spray Pump Catalog 
F. E. MYERS & BROR 1      ,0R10 
Subscribe For 
Wisconsin 
Horticulture 
                                     NOMINATION BLANK 
   Applications for life membership must be accompanied bp nomination blank,
signed bp a life 
member or annual member in good standing for two or more pears. 
   I n o m in a te   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - --- 
- --  --- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - 
for Life Membership in The Wisconsin State Horticultural Societlp. 
       N am e --------------------------------------------------- 
8 
September 1910 
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