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Toepel, M. G.; Kuehn, Hazel L. (ed.) / The Wisconsin Blue Book
(1958)

Wisconsin in 1958,   pp. [69]-[228] PDF (45.4 MB)


Page 84


  84                   WISCONSIN BLUE BOOK
  white with .8 per cent Negro and .4 per cent Indian. Since 1880 the
  number and per cent of various races has been as follows:
       Year    White       Negro      Indian   Mongolianr    Other
       1880   1,307,618     2,702      3,161         16
       1890   1,680,828     2,444      9,930        128
       1900   2,057,911     2,542      8,372        217
       1910   2,320,555     2,900      10,142       260
       1920   2,616,938     5,201      9,611        311            6
       1930   2,916,255    10,739      11,548       387          77
       1940   3,112,752    12,158      12,265       313          99
       1950   3,392,690    28,182     12,196       1,119        388
 While 1,434,000 of the 3,392,000 Caucasians in the state in 1950
 lived in the urban areas, 26,749 of the 28,182 Negroes and only 1,189
 of the 12,196 Indians lived in such places. It is therefore apparent
 that most Negroes live in cities, most Indians live in rural areas and
 that whites are still pretty evenly split between rural and urban
 areas with the urban areas having a slight edge.
                National Origin of Foreign-Born Whites
   In the 40 years between 1910 and 1950 the number of foreign-
 born white residents in Wisconsin declined from 512,569 to 218,234.
 Since 1860 the total number of foreign-born increased rapidly until
 1900 when it started to decline so that we have fewer today than in
 1860, but the proportion of foreign-born declined each decade.
                       Total                Total            Per Cent
      Year           Population           Foreign-born       of Total
      1860             775,881             276,927             35.8
      1870            1,054,670           .364,499             34.5
      1880           1,315,497             405,425             30.8
      1890            1,693,330            519,199             30.6
      1900           2,069,042             515,971             24.9
      1910           2,333,860             512,569*            21.9
      1920           2,632,067             460,128"            17.4
      1930           2,939,006             387,980*            13.2
      1940           3,137,587             288,774*             9.2
      1950           3,434,575             218,234*             6.3
 *Foreign-born whites only
   Where do the foreign-born come from?       Throughout the history
of this state the largest number of foreign-born have come from
Germany. In the first half century of the life of this state the
second largest group of foreign-born came from Ireland and the
third largest group from England and Wales, with Norway fourth
and Canada fifth.
   After 1900 the Norwegians rose to second place, the Polish im-
migrants rose to third place and the Austrian to fourth. In 1950 the
largest groups of foreign-born whites in Wisconsin came from Ger-
many, Poland, Russia, Norway, Italy and Sweden in that order.
   An analysis of the foreign-born population by counties reveals two
interesting ideas. With rare exceptions Milwaukee County has the
largest number of foreign-born of specific nationalities. This is be-
cause Milwaukee County has so many more people in it than any
other county. It also accounts in part for the fact that Racine and


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