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Wisconsin Dairymen's Association / Fortieth annual report of the Wisconsin Dairymen's Association : held at Beloit, Wis., November, 1911. Report of the proceedings, annual address of the president, and interesting essays and discussions relating to the dairy interests
(1912)

James, W. D.
Building the dairy barn,   pp. 64-81 PDF (3.4 MB)


Page 77


Wisconsin Dairymen's Association.
The opening of the outtake flues should be close to the floor. The
cows breathe the impurities directly to the floor where the carbon di-
oxide tends to remain; it being heavier than the rest of the air in the
stable. The coldest air is also at the floor and the warm air at the
ceiling. It in the cold air that we wish to remove rather than the warm.
When the cattle face the walls, the openings of the intake flues
should be just at the ceiling so that the fresh air will discharge over
the feed alley and work toward the rear to the outtake flues. Location
of the outtake flues should be at the rear of the cattle just over the
the gutters.
PLANK FRAMING.
With the scarcity of heavy timber and its high cost, we are forced
to study newer methods of framing where no timber is thicker than
two inches and from six to ten inches wide.
The use of hay and grain elevating machinery requires barns with
open centers. Open crossbeams, collar beams, etc., are in a way quite
necessary.
The illustration herewith gives a clear idea of this method of fram-
ing the barn. It is the newest thing in barn framing and at the same
time is very much stronger than the old fashioned frame made of
large timber. It is not nearly as costly and a first-class carpenter is not
required to erect it.
The driveway should be used on the second floor, where it is pos-
sible to have an approach that is not too steep.
The granary and feed rooms should be located on the second floor
preferably at the silo end of the barn, thus adding to the convenience
in handling feed, etc. Silos and feed rooms should be located at the
ends of the barn.
Discussio-N.
Mr. Emery: Where the air passes in at the intake, it has a ten-
dency to come straight and not go to the center of the barn. Even
with four shutes going up here, I think the air is very likely not to
get to the center of the barn. I have studied that matter for several
years, and I could not bring myself to give up some stalls in the
center of the barn to make room for the ventilator. I went to Professor
King and he convinced me it would be economy on my part to give up
those stalls in the center of the barn so that the air would come in
there and go all over the barn, and go directly up out of the barn
from the center.
77


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