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Wisconsin Dairymen's Association / Eleventh annual report of the Wisconsin Dairymen's Association : held at Elk-horn, Wis., January 31, and February 1 and 2, 1883. Report of the proceedings, annual address of the president, and interesting essays relating to the dairy interests
(1883)

Smith, Hiram
How to make good dairy farms worth one hundred dollars per acre,   pp. 49-55 PDF (1.5 MB)


Page 51

 
WwOON1sN D&utxEN's Asso.&TION. 
Tiniateetfl an t0 acre at W per acre at 5 per cent ............ $40000 
}lr     an  co . .............................................g on  oo  45
00 
i  _ _ b  amd   .........................................team*  45  00 
biro hred men one 12 and one 8 m   onths.......................  820 00 
Onegir ......................................................  100 00 
Mama  a d  repairs ..................  ...... ........ .  ... 15000 
V Aim    not ried ...................................... .. z. ..... 100
00 
Total expnse .......... $1,100 00 
It will be readily perceived that a dairy farm, conducted 
as stated above, and as nine-tenths of the dairy fUmas in 
this country are conducted, the land cannot be made to pay 
more than five per cent. interest on a valuation of 50 per 
acre. But little or no concentrated food, such as bran, oil 
meal and corn meal is used, except a few days in the spring. 
The farm will produce much more coarse food than 20 cows 
can possibly digest, therefore there is a waste. Little or no 
system prevails. Cows are neglected to secure grain crops; 
there being plenty of pasture no fodder corn is raised. 
Cows are only milked in summer, and but little corn is 
raised. Manure that should go upon the corn land from 
day to day, as it accumulates, is usually thrown out of the 
stable window under the eaves of the barn to leach and 
waste until the following autumn, usually to be plowed 
under beyond the reach of plant life. This kind of dairy 
farming is largely practiced at the present day, and was al- 
most universal fifteen or twenty years ago, and wherever 
practiced keeps dairy farms at a value of $50 per aere, or 
below. But happily there is another kind of dairy farming, 
"modern dairy farming," which is conducted on an entirely 
different plan - on the principle of high feeding and warm 
stables, and avoids all waste of coarse food, by the purchase 
of bran, midlings and oil meal, to mix in and make all val- 
uable. 
Modern Dairy Farming starts out with keeping one cow 
on four acres, and this should be the " pass word " to every 
Dairy Lodge, " one cow to four acres," and this should be 
rapidly reduced, until the undoubted possibility was reached, 
of keeping one cow to every acre. One of the principles of 
Modern Dairy Farming is to have their cows give the most 
milk, when the dairy products are in highest price, which is 
mvariably in winter. It has been repeatedly demonstrated 
51 


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