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Wisconsin Cheese Makers' Association / Proceedings of the Wisconsin Cheese Makers' Association forty-second annual convention November 15, 16, 1933 assembled in the Eagles Auditorium Sheboygan, Wisconsin
(1934)

Appointment of committees,   pp. 26-27 PDF (466.8 KB)


Leopold, Max
Address,   pp. 27-30 PDF (985.1 KB)


Page 27


FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL CONVENTION                    27
Thu PznimiT:     One of the committees can meet in my room at
the hotel.
Trn SRzrWAY: Mr. Chairman, I suggest to the committees that
the secretary's office has typewriters and a couple of girls to run them
if you want your reports typed at any time.
ADDRESS
By MAX IDorowD, Vesper, Chairman of the Governor's
Fact-finding Committee
Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen: I am not a cheese maker
and I am not here to give you the report of the governor's fact-finding
committee. I met Mr. Graf the first time sometime in August, I be-
lieve, and he asked me at that time whether I would have a chance
to come and explain my opinion on the things I saw from the fact-
finding committee as an individual. What I am going to say this
afternoon may not probably be new to you cheese makers, but it was
new to me as a private farmer.
I have lived in the same township in Wood County thirty years the
first of May, 1934. I have seen a good many cheese factories come
and a good many cheese factories go. Especially have I seen some of
them go since 1922 or 1923 when we were fortunate or unfortunate
enough to have Mr. Borden come up to Marshfield and A. & P. come
to our part of the country. This group of nine farmers on the com-
mittee did not have any particular high school or university educa-
tion. We were going in the wrong way, an uncultured way, if you
please, to find out what is wrong with the cheese industry. If we had
some background or university training or being a paid official or state
employee for years back, we might have had an easy job because we
would know something to go by, but just take nine farmers in your
own community and say to them "You go and find out what is wrong
with the cheese industry". It is quite a job. None of them were
cheese makers, or cheese dealers, none of them a processor, and none
of them sold cheese in any quantity with the exception that I was
secretary of our cheese factory and we sent out cheese.
In the State of Wisconsin a greater share of our income is depend-
ent on dairy, and less and less on other commodities. We found out
that in Wisconsin in 1932, 28 per cent of all the milk has gone into
cheese.
In 1895 we had 1337 cheese factories in the State and the average
production per cheese factory was 39,253 pounds per year. We
reached the highest in number of cheese factories in 1921 with 2,807
cheese factories, and at that time the average production per cheese
factory was 106,424 pounds of cheese. We have dropped down to
nearly 2,000 cheese factories in 1932; we are producing about 309,-
000,000 pounds of cheese and the average production per cheese fac-
tory has increased to 142,706 pounds. Nearly four times as much
cheese was made in each cheese factory in 1932 as in 1895.
When I speak about cheese makers I mean all cheese makers, and
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