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Wisconsin Cheese Makers' Association / Proceedings of the Wisconsin Cheese Makers' Association thirty-third annual convention December 10, 11, 12, 1924 assembled in the Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
(1925)

Giffen, S. J.
Paying premiums for fancy cheese,   pp. 53-54 PDF (494.1 KB)


Ubbelohde, T. A.
Why some co-operative factories fail and others succeed,   pp. 54-57 PDF (1.0 MB)


Page 54


54   WISCONSIN CHEESE MAKERS' ASSOCIATION
sold them as off grades, although they had been sold to us as normal
ones. We find that the average cheese maker that is interested in
making good cheese is more than glad to take the extra effort to make
a Fancy cheese if he or his farmer or the two combined get a benefit
out of it, but as it is you can't blame him for making an ordinary
No. 1 cheese when his neighbor is making the same and is getting
the same price for it and he (the neighbor) is going by his factory
at half past eleven or twelve o'clock and giving him the glad hand
and showing you that he is on his way to town and we are working
yet. We simply want to mention that we find the proposition of
Fancies and paying extra for it is working out to good advantage to
ourselves and to those that are shipping to us, and we feel that it is
going to be of a general good in helping to boost the consumption of
cheese. I thank you. (Applause.)
"WHY SOME CO-OPERATIVE FACTORIES FAIL
AND OTHERS SUCCEED"
By MR. T. A. UBBELOHDE, of Glenbeulah
Mr. President and Cheese Makers:    I had prepared a paper
and just got it out on the typewriter and I laid it on the sideboard,
and I suppose it was a pretty neat paper, but my wife is particular
about not having the sideboard littered up with waste paper and she
glanced at it and thought it must be an advertisement for some
Dairy Feed and she burned it up. (Laughter). So I have nothing
but a few notes that I took last summer. I am sorry because I
had to spend quite a bit of time to prepare this paper.
I went to quite a number of factories so I haven't got much of
offer to you but I have visited some factories-co-operative factories
that were successful. Everybody was slick and the first thing when
I went in to speak to the cheese maker he was ready to shake
hands with me-everything was 0. K. and he had no kick coming
from any of the farmers. The milk seemed to be all right.
Talking about this cheese, the supply people that he was doing
business with, said there was nothing wrong. The supply man was
all right; they furnished the goods they called for and it was satis-
factory. Well, I says how is the cheese dealer? Why they take
our cheese and there never is a kick. We get full weight and we
get full price. Well, I says, over here is another factory that I
have been to-these same dealers are cutting them all the time-
not giving them full weight and they are kicking about the grade.
He says to me, we have no kick coming; the cheese dealers have
always used us right.
Then I went to another factory and it was about the same thing.
Everything was 0. K.
I visited several unsuccessful co-operative creameries and the
first thing there was a kick coming-the factory was in bad shape-
the cheese maker seemed to have a grouch on-everything was


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