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Stratford centennial
(1891-1991)

Stratford "we serve our country",   pp. 133-141


Page 134

John Landwehr
Henry Lillge
Henry Toelle
William Stotmeister
Joseph Brei
Roger Schuette
Andrew McGivern
Henry Steiner, Sr.
Louis Schreiner
Herbert Garbisch
Jacob Morris
Edward Wagner
Frank Weber
Anton Weber
Alex Piontek
Charles Kaiser
Frank Laessig
Geroge Kann, Sr.
William Bradley
Michael Zenner
Leo Platteter
Thomas Simolke
John Kroening
Ervin Belanger
Jacob Drexler
Charles Drexler
James Hayes
Andrew McGivern
Leo Schelb
Joseph Resch
Barney Skaya
Albert Riehle
Albert Schmidt
Letters Home
The back issues of the Stratford Journal contained many
letters from area men serving in World War I. They provide
a glimpse of the times.
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Popp received the following letter
from their son, William, from somewhere in France:
June 20, 1918
Dear Mother and Father.
Will drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well,
and hope to remain in the very best of health, hoping that this
letter will find you all the same.
We have been having very fine weather here, up to a few
days ago, when it started to rain and is mining today, and have
enough rain now to last for a month. I hope it will stop soon
as the trenches get muddy, but the boys don't think of the mud
at all, when they see a German they are all anxious to take a
shot at him.
Well how is everybody around home now, I suppose they
are busy putting in crops, and taking care of their gardens. The
people over here have very nice gardens and they sure do take
care of them, as they have to raise everything in the line of food
from their gardens.
It is just haying time over here now, the people have lots
of hay cut and ready to haul in, but too much rain, what hay is
cut is likely to spoil, and the people here haven't any to lose.
You ought to see the old women out in the fields, some are so
old they can hardly walk, but they have to get out in the field
in order to get the crops in.
You wrote about writing a nice letter about the country
and the people; but as things are, a fellow can't write much
over in this country, and any how if there are any fellows that
would like to know what this country looks like let them enlist
and come across, the more men over here, the better chance we
have with the enemy.
I am taking a medical treatment for my blood, and am not
with the company at present, but expect to get back very soon.
Will close for this time, tell everybody hello for me, that
I'm still feeling fine. Closing with best wishes and regards.
Hoping to return to you soon.
From your loving son,
William H. Popp
From Stratford Journal, July 5, 1918
More Selects Notified
The following are some of the boys who received their
notices to report for Military Service, and will leave here
Monday, July 8.
Paul Zettler, Mike Fisher, Fred Lillge, Frank Sweick-
hoefer, Joe Hayes, Bill Stemler.
From Stratford Journal, Aug. 9, 1918
A Soldier's Letter
Mr. & Mrs. William Spencer, Sr. received the following
letter from their son, William, from somewhere in France:
June 23, 1918
Dear Folks:
Just a few lines to let you know that I am well and hope
you are the same. Well how is everything at home? I suppose
you have all your crops in by this time. Everything looks nice
around here.
We are in a nice place now, and the people around here
certainly use us fine. They do all they can to make it like home
for us.


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