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Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association / Proceedings of the tenth annual meeting of the Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association held at Monroe, Wisconsin, Thurs. and Fri., January 27 and 28, 1910
(1910)

Baer, U. S.
Reasons why every dairyman and cheesemaker should support our association,   pp. 84-87 PDF (746.6 KB)


Page 86


TENTi ANNUAL CONVENTION
cheese in every market where    it is known; a good
name justly deserve(d because won by merit. We have wag-
ed an uncompromising war on all fradulent cheese and
have sought to place our product upon the market, whlet-
her at home or al)roa(l, for just what it is. The true Wis-
consin cheese factory brand is today a guarantee of ex-
cellence and genuineness in the best cheese markets of the
world .
The more we study and investigate the dairy situation
as it exists in this state today, the more we are convinced
that it is the work done by associations of this kind that
has largely been instrumental in developing the patriotic
and humane spirit that has enabled the individual farmer,
dairyman, cheesemaker and buttermaker to set aside their
perstonal - shall I say it? -- greed, in order to promote
the common weal. The    greatest barriers to cooperation
have been and always will be. selfishness and bickerings,
and these two defects have to a great extent been elimninat-
ed. or at least modified by the influences coming out of
these various dairy association meetings held at different
times an(l at different places throughout the state.
The rapid growth of the( dairy interests of the state
has been brought about in a large measure through the
influences that have been  at work through the different
dairy organizations teaching the dairymen and the cheese-
makers and buttermakers thc value of dairying as a means
of revenue and as a renovator of soils. These societies
have given the dairymen powerful object lessons in the
shape of improved stock and well-finished dairy products.
They have been strong agencies for the distribution of
dairy knowledge and the defense of legitimate dairy pro-
ducts from the competition of counterfeits and frauds.
The beneficial results attained by meetings such as
this are everywhere apparent in renewed interest in the
dairy business, in the improvement of stock, in the better
care of milk, and the manufacure of a better quality of


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