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Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association / Proceedings of the tenth annual meeting of the Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association held at Monroe, Wisconsin, Thurs. and Fri., January 27 and 28, 1910
(1910)

Readheimer, J. E.
Phosphorus as a fertilizer on the dairy farm,   pp. 75-83 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 82


82            TENTH ANNUMA CONVENTION
45 bushels on land not treated. The same year on an 80
acre field of oats rock phosphate increased the yield from
25 bushels per acre to 40 bushels per acre.
In 1908 rock phosphate increased the Vield of wheat
from 26 bushels per acre fo 41 bushels per acre and oats
from 25 bushels per acre to 0)) bushels per acre. In 190') a
40 acre field of 20 year old pasture sod yielde(l 59 bushels of
corn per acre on untreated land an(l SI bushels on treated
land. Also in 19109 on an 8) acre clover sod that had been
in continous cultivation under the four year rotation for
thirty years, without manure or pasture yielde(l on the Un-
treated lan(l 65 bushels of corn and on treated land 81 bushels
per acre.
In 1908, an 80 acre field of clover yielded 2' tons of
hay in the first cutting on the treated land and only I A
tons on the untreated land.
Phosphorus not only pro(luces larger yields of grain,
but the grain is of better quality. It hastens maturity and
tills out the grain better. Grain grown on soil well sup)-
plied with phosphorus is always plumper an(l heavier than
grain grown on soil deficient in phosl)horus. In 19io) oats
grown on land to which phosphorus had been apl)lie I
weighed 35 pounds per bushel while the oats grown on
untreated land weighed only 20) pounds per bushel. The
same is truey of corn and wheat.
Raw rock phosphate, finely ground and carrying 12 to
12A per cent of the element phosphorus, can be purchased
from a number of firms in Tennessee for $3 01) to $4.5,0t per
ton and the freight rate to northern Illinois or southern
Wisconsin should not be more than $3.50 to $4.00 per toil.
This means that enough phosphorus can be bought in raw
rock phosphate for $S.04) or $9.00 to produce a thousand
bushels of corn. This is at a cost of less than one cent
per bushel.
The yielding possibilities of the soil are almost unflimit-
ed where the necessary plant food is provided.  One acre
of land in North Carolina in 1909 produced 226k bushels of


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