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Wisconsin. State Conservation Committee (1915-27) / Biennial report of the State Conservation Commission of Wisconsin for the years 1915 and 1916
(1916)

State forest nurseries,   pp. 105-107 PDF (601.5 KB)


Stock distribution,   pp. 107-112 PDF (1.1 MB)


Page 107


                          BIENNIAL    REPORT                       107
  coniferous species, being located on a sandy loam soil. The Tomahawk
  lake site is composed of heavier soil and is intended more for the raising
  of the broad leaved trees. Each nursery is equipped with the necessary
  fences, roads, shade frames, tools and watering facilities to properly
care
  for and protect the growing seedlings and transplants to all times of the
  year.
    The nursery work under the administration of the Conservation Com-
  mission has experienced a healthy growth. During the spring of 1916,
  1,501,000 two-year seedlings were transplanted at an average cost of 85
  cts. per thousand. These transplants were composed of the following
  species:
                      NUMBER OF TRANSPLANTS
                                Trout Lake Nursery. Tomahawk Lake Nurs.
 White pine ...............................   220 000   222,600
 Red pine.648,000                                        220,400
 Scoth pin                             88.000
   Soc h   p in e  .................................. ... ... ..
 Norway   spruce ...............................  102,000
                                     1.058,000           443,000
                SEED BEDS WERE SOWN AS FOLLOWS:
                               Trout Lake Nursery. Tomahawk Lake Nurs.
 White pine...............................50               20
 Red pine ...............................   20
 Scotch pine...............................66                10
 White spruce                           6                  8
 Norway   spruce.............,..........................  15  10
 White ash.150 3
 Basswood  ....................................... .....   2
                                       157                53
   The results of this work were fairly satisfactory. The extreme dry spell
 in July caused the loss of some of the transplants, but the heaviest damage
 was done by the June beetle grubs. These occurred in unusual numbers.
 They work underground, chewing off the roots of the trees, thus causing
 them to wither and die. They are especially destructive to transplants.
 At present no effective way has been discovered to combat them. In
 ordinary years the damage from this cause is light, but during years
 when the grubs are unusually numerous, their work is very destructive
 and this is especially true on new land.
 Except for the practical failure of the Scotch pine seed beds, due to the
 long storage to which the seed had been subjected on account of the war,
 the sowing of 1916 was of average success. Very good stands of white and
 red pine and Norway spruce were obtained.
                      STOCK DISTRIBUTION.
  The distribution of nursery stock throughout the state was especially
noteworthy during 1916. The following tables give complete data relative
to these shipments. Especial attention is called to the steady increase
in the shipments to private parties.


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