University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Wisconsin. State Conservation Committee (1915-27) / Biennial report of the State Conservation Commission of Wisconsin for the years 1915 and 1916
(1916)

Ripple, R. L.
The use of gasoline in the treatment of fin trouble among brook trout,   pp. 34-37 PDF (746.8 KB)


Page 35


                         BIENNIAL     REPORT                        35
 time the disease was at its worst, and mentioned for me to try gasoline
 and kerosene on the fish, and see what effect that would have upon them.
   The next day my good neighbor, Mr. Nourse, called me up saying that
 he wanted me to come over and help him make up a small crowd for an
 hour at his farm adjoining the hatchery, as one of University of Wisconsin
 men was to give a talk on the Diseases and Care of Sheep. I want to say
 here that I never will be sorry because of the one and one-half hours put
 in at that talk. The gentleman discribed the different diseases of sheep
 and finally came to stomach trouble and stomach worms and stated in his
 remarks that 2 spoonfuls of gasoline to 3 ounces of fresh cows' milk would
 cure and rid the sheep of worms. In my desperation in trying to do for
 my bunch of trout, I thought if gasoline had a killing effect on the stomach
 worms in sheep, why not might its uses be applied to this fin disease of
 my trout, as I had, of course, supposed that the fin trouble was a germ
or
 parasite of some kind. It did not take me long to collect a half dozen of
 my worst affected yearling trout and place them in a quart of pure gasoline.
 In one minute by the watch all were quiet; the struggling of the trout was
 over; two more minutes elapsed, at which time they were removed to a
 vat of running water. After watching them several minutes without a
 quiver ahywhere, feeling sorry, giving them up as dead and intending
 trying another lot for a shorter period of time in the gasoline, I was called
 out on the pounds. In about 15 minutes upon my return to the hatchery,
 I discovered my treated trout swiming about gaily. To test their welfare,
 I gave them some nice fresh liver to humbly atone for the trick I had
 served them. To my surprise they took food readily. To my further
 surprise, as I happened to glance into the gasoline measure in which they
 had been treated, I found that the gasoline was of dirty brownish color
 and jelly-like, and this proved to me that something had come off those
 trout.
 The treated fish fairly glistened in coloring, they were so clean. The
 frayed fins turned whitish color at the diseased ends. It was not long
 before I treated quite a number in like manner, and kept two tanks
 going, one with the gasoline treated fish, and the other tank containing
the
 salt brined trout. There was ai loss in both tanks, but much greater by
 far in the salted tank. As I was treating my worst cases in both instances,
 there was bound to be a death loss among the gasoline treated trout from
 those fish that were beyond any hope anyway.
 My experiments told me as far as I carried them that there is something
 to gasoline in the treatment and cleaning up of trout that should be carried
 out in a more scientific manner. Three minutes is the limit of time which
 brook trout will stand the clear gasoline, and revive in running water.
 The final loss of this bunch of trout was about one-half. Of those treated
 with gasoline, many were no doubt beyond any help at that time.
 Without more positive proof on my part, owing to absence of strong
 magnifying glasses, and proper amount of time to devote to the work,
 and the advanced stage of the disease when the gasoline treatment was
 begun, I cannot state just what results were obtained. At any rate, here
 is something worth further consideration in the cleaning up of trout, and
 in the treatment of fin trouble herein referred to, especially if started
when
the fin trouble is in the first stages.
U
I
I
U
I
I
U
I
I
U
I
I
U
I
I
U
I
I
U
I
I
U
I
I
U
I
I
-
0


Go up to Top of Page