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Wisconsin. State Conservation Committee (1915-27) / Biennial report of the State Conservation Commission of Wisconsin for the years 1915 and 1916
(1916)

Survey of trough streams,   pp. 26-30 PDF (1008.0 KB)


Page 30


30         WISCONSIN CONSERVATION COMMISSION
bass during June he will admit, if he is truthful, that practically every
female he caught was full of spawn. Give the black bass a chance to
spawn and reproduce, and Wisconsin will always be one of the best black
bass fishing states in the Union. The natural reproduction of young bass
in the spring of 1916 was- much better than the average year. This is
due to the fact that the bass spawned late, the early fishermen quit after
four or five days fishing on the spawning beds. Later the bass came in
and many of the mature fish that would have been caught earlier in the
season were left undisturbed, and the result was a good crop of bass fry.
This condition means thousands of dollars to future sportsmen.
  On the following pages will be found papers by Mr. John H. Lowe, of
the University of Wisconsin, and Mr. R. L. Ripple, foreman of the Bay-
field State Hatchery, regarding the use of gasoline and benzine in the treat--
ment of trout attacked by a parasitic copepod commonly known as "fish
lice" and causing an infection known as "gill trouble." As
yet the work
is in the early experimental stage, but I feel much encouraged as to the
treatment developing into an important factor in the propagation of brook
trout. Fish, like the human family, are subject to disease. The most
common in the trout family is the above mentioned gill trouble. If un-
checked the death rate among the confined fish is enormous. Scientists
and fish culturists have spent years of study to find some method of check-
ing the disease in the early stages. The pioneers in trout culture dis-
covered that bathing the fish in a strong salt brine would, to some extent,
check the ravages of gill trouble and to the present writing this is still
considered the most beneficial remedy.
  At the meeting held in Sturgeon Bay, Capt. Albert Kalmbach, who was
born on the shores of Lake Michigan and who has been a commercial
fisherman for some 45 years, read a paper to the fishermen present. The
sentiment and ideas expressed by Capt. Kalmbach are so absolutely true
and parallel with the conservation ideas of this commission that I take a
great pleasure in printing his paper in this report.
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